Bcl-2 and the regulation of programmed cell death

Bcl-2 and the regulation of programmed cell death La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation, Cancer Research Center, Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor Gene Program, La Jolla, California 92037 HE terms programmed cell death (PCD) 1 and apoptosis are often used interchangeably to describe a mechanism of cellular demise that is believed to play an important role in a wide variety of physiological situations, and that when dysregulated can contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases ranging from cancer to AIDS. Recently, the bcl-2 gene has emerged as a critical regulator of PCD in a variety of physiological and pathological contexts. Discovery of bcl-2 and Its Involvement in t(14:18) Translocations Bcl-2 is the acronym for the B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene. As implied by its name, this gene was first discovered because of its involvement in B-cell malignancies, where chromosomal translocations activate the gene in the majority of follicular non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas (Tsujimoto et al., 1985). In these translocations, the bcl-2 gene is moved from its normal chromosomal location at 18q21 into juxtaposition with powerful enhancer elements in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) locus at 14q32, with the result being deregulation of the translocated bcl-2 gene and overproduction of bci-2 mRNAs and their encoded proteins (reviewed by Nowell and Croce, 1987). Though http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Cell Biology Rockefeller University Press

Bcl-2 and the regulation of programmed cell death

The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 124 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by The Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0021-9525
eISSN
1540-8140
DOI
10.1083/jcb.124.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation, Cancer Research Center, Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor Gene Program, La Jolla, California 92037 HE terms programmed cell death (PCD) 1 and apoptosis are often used interchangeably to describe a mechanism of cellular demise that is believed to play an important role in a wide variety of physiological situations, and that when dysregulated can contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases ranging from cancer to AIDS. Recently, the bcl-2 gene has emerged as a critical regulator of PCD in a variety of physiological and pathological contexts. Discovery of bcl-2 and Its Involvement in t(14:18) Translocations Bcl-2 is the acronym for the B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene. As implied by its name, this gene was first discovered because of its involvement in B-cell malignancies, where chromosomal translocations activate the gene in the majority of follicular non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas (Tsujimoto et al., 1985). In these translocations, the bcl-2 gene is moved from its normal chromosomal location at 18q21 into juxtaposition with powerful enhancer elements in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) locus at 14q32, with the result being deregulation of the translocated bcl-2 gene and overproduction of bci-2 mRNAs and their encoded proteins (reviewed by Nowell and Croce, 1987). Though

Journal

The Journal of Cell BiologyRockefeller University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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