Activated Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Akt Kinase Promote Survival of Superior Cervical Neurons

Activated Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Akt Kinase Promote Survival of Superior Cervical Neurons The signaling pathways that mediate the ability of NGF to support survival of dependent neurons are not yet completely clear. However previous work has shown that the c-Jun pathway is activated after NGF withdrawal, and blocking this pathway blocks neuronal cell death. In this paper we show that over-expression in sympathetic neurons of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase or its downstream effector Akt kinase blocks cell death after NGF withdrawal, in spite of the fact that the c-Jun pathway is activated. Yet, neither the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 nor a dominant negative PI 3-kinase cause sympathetic neurons to die if they are maintained in NGF. Thus, although NGF may regulate multiple pathways involved in neuronal survival, stimulation of the PI 3-kinase pathway is sufficient to allow cells to survive in the absence of this factor. Footnotes Address all correspondence to Karen Philpott, Eisai London Research Laboratories Ltd., Bernard Katz Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. Tel.: (44) 171-388-4746. Fax: (44) 171-413-1121. E-mail: kphilpott@elrl.co.uk Abbreviations used in this paper: CGN cerebellar granule neurons GSK glycogen synthase kinase IGF insulin-like growth factor PI phosphatidylinositol SCG superior cervical ganglion Submitted: 2 April 1997 Revision received 13 August 1997 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Cell Biology Rockefeller University Press

Activated Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Akt Kinase Promote Survival of Superior Cervical Neurons

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Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
© 1997 Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0021-9525
eISSN
1540-8140
D.O.I.
10.1083/jcb.139.3.809
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The signaling pathways that mediate the ability of NGF to support survival of dependent neurons are not yet completely clear. However previous work has shown that the c-Jun pathway is activated after NGF withdrawal, and blocking this pathway blocks neuronal cell death. In this paper we show that over-expression in sympathetic neurons of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase or its downstream effector Akt kinase blocks cell death after NGF withdrawal, in spite of the fact that the c-Jun pathway is activated. Yet, neither the PI 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 nor a dominant negative PI 3-kinase cause sympathetic neurons to die if they are maintained in NGF. Thus, although NGF may regulate multiple pathways involved in neuronal survival, stimulation of the PI 3-kinase pathway is sufficient to allow cells to survive in the absence of this factor. Footnotes Address all correspondence to Karen Philpott, Eisai London Research Laboratories Ltd., Bernard Katz Building, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. Tel.: (44) 171-388-4746. Fax: (44) 171-413-1121. E-mail: kphilpott@elrl.co.uk Abbreviations used in this paper: CGN cerebellar granule neurons GSK glycogen synthase kinase IGF insulin-like growth factor PI phosphatidylinositol SCG superior cervical ganglion Submitted: 2 April 1997 Revision received 13 August 1997

Journal

The Journal of Cell BiologyRockefeller University Press

Published: Nov 3, 1997

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