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Zionism and the Roads Not Taken: Rawidowicz, Kaplan, Kohn (review)

Zionism and the Roads Not Taken: Rawidowicz, Kaplan, Kohn (review) level. Even that poignant line from Amichai's And Who Will Remember the Rememberers?: "My son, my husband, my brother, my husband, my son" is in the generic. The editors cut out three of the poem's five stanzas, perchance to shield the reader from lines like this: "An oleander branch, like a shock of hair on a beloved face." Jews don't have faces in this collection. The poets have effectively succeeded in blacking out one entire side of a conflict. But the editors were unwilling to admit to this, and unwilling, or perhaps unable, to help us place this literature in the context of Israeli poetry, hegemony, and dissent in Israeli cultural politics, or the long history of Hebrew protest poetry to which we have referred. If this represents what is best of recent Hebrew protest poetry, the implications for Israeli culture are disheartening. However, as the Haaretz journalist Michal Palti has observed (Notes to the Prime Minister, March 11, 2003), contemporary Israeli music and rap (take Hadag Nahash, Tippex, Subliminal) have struck a wide range of political notes--and probably have more to tell us about Israeli society than these 88 poems. What, then, is the value of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Zionism and the Roads Not Taken: Rawidowicz, Kaplan, Kohn (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

level. Even that poignant line from Amichai's And Who Will Remember the Rememberers?: "My son, my husband, my brother, my husband, my son" is in the generic. The editors cut out three of the poem's five stanzas, perchance to shield the reader from lines like this: "An oleander branch, like a shock of hair on a beloved face." Jews don't have faces in this collection. The poets have effectively succeeded in blacking out one entire side of a conflict. But the editors were unwilling to admit to this, and unwilling, or perhaps unable, to help us place this literature in the context of Israeli poetry, hegemony, and dissent in Israeli cultural politics, or the long history of Hebrew protest poetry to which we have referred. If this represents what is best of recent Hebrew protest poetry, the implications for Israeli culture are disheartening. However, as the Haaretz journalist Michal Palti has observed (Notes to the Prime Minister, March 11, 2003), contemporary Israeli music and rap (take Hadag Nahash, Tippex, Subliminal) have struck a wide range of political notes--and probably have more to tell us about Israeli society than these 88 poems. What, then, is the value of this

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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