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Zionism and International Law: A Forgotten Synthesis

Zionism and International Law: A Forgotten Synthesis Zionism and International Law: A Forgotten Synthesis Noam Pianko The current government of Israel tends to perceive human-rights orga- nizations, international legal bodies, and demands for minority rights as political forces that unfairly target the Jewish state in the hopes of eroding its legitimacy. A recent nongovernmental-organization law, for example, demands that Israeli nonprot fi organizations that receive the majority of their funds from foreign sources publicly disclose the sources of their funding. The fact that twenty-five of the twenty-seven not-for-prot o fi rganizations affected by this legislation are international human-rights organizations strongly suggests that the primary goal of this legislation is to marginalize human-rights organizations operating In another high-profile example, the “nation-state bill” now in Israel. under consideration in the Knesset identie fi s Israel as the “nation-state of the Jewish people”—a signic fi ant shift from the state’s founding documents, which define the state as fostering “the development of By aligning the state’s mission the country for all of its inhabitants.” with the Jewish people rather than its citizens, this bill leaves less room for the Palestinian Israeli minority to advocate for additional civil and national rights. These laws indicate that many Israelis view the collec- tion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Zionism and International Law: A Forgotten Synthesis

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165

Abstract

Zionism and International Law: A Forgotten Synthesis Noam Pianko The current government of Israel tends to perceive human-rights orga- nizations, international legal bodies, and demands for minority rights as political forces that unfairly target the Jewish state in the hopes of eroding its legitimacy. A recent nongovernmental-organization law, for example, demands that Israeli nonprot fi organizations that receive the majority of their funds from foreign sources publicly disclose the sources of their funding. The fact that twenty-five of the twenty-seven not-for-prot o fi rganizations affected by this legislation are international human-rights organizations strongly suggests that the primary goal of this legislation is to marginalize human-rights organizations operating In another high-profile example, the “nation-state bill” now in Israel. under consideration in the Knesset identie fi s Israel as the “nation-state of the Jewish people”—a signic fi ant shift from the state’s founding documents, which define the state as fostering “the development of By aligning the state’s mission the country for all of its inhabitants.” with the Jewish people rather than its citizens, this bill leaves less room for the Palestinian Israeli minority to advocate for additional civil and national rights. These laws indicate that many Israelis view the collec- tion

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Mar 15, 2019

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