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Yesterday (My Story) (review)

Yesterday (My Story) (review) Yesterday (My Story), by Hadassah Rosensaft. Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 2005. 207 pp. Anyone working in the field of Holocaust scholarship, education, and remembrance knows all too well that we are the last to live in the presence of survivors. Those who were a mere 18 upon liberation are now 80 and those who were 30 are now 92, so there will come a time--all too soon--when the last survivor is no longer. And yet, no generation has left as monumental a record behind. When the destruction was ongoing, historians and rabbis, chroniclers and ordinary men, women and children took it upon themselves to document what was happening, day-by-day, ghetto-by-ghetto, camp-by-camp. And afterwards, both in the immediate aftermath and for the next six decades, survivors bore witness. They wrote memoirs and gave testimony to assist future generation in the task of remembrance and to ensure that the record of what happened could be seen from the victim's perspective. Even today, more than three score years after the Event, survivors continue to compile memoirs and to find ways in which they can be published. These testimonies have taken on an added urgency because survivors are acutely aware that their time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Yesterday (My Story), by Hadassah Rosensaft. Jerusalem: Yad Vashem, 2005. 207 pp. Anyone working in the field of Holocaust scholarship, education, and remembrance knows all too well that we are the last to live in the presence of survivors. Those who were a mere 18 upon liberation are now 80 and those who were 30 are now 92, so there will come a time--all too soon--when the last survivor is no longer. And yet, no generation has left as monumental a record behind. When the destruction was ongoing, historians and rabbis, chroniclers and ordinary men, women and children took it upon themselves to document what was happening, day-by-day, ghetto-by-ghetto, camp-by-camp. And afterwards, both in the immediate aftermath and for the next six decades, survivors bore witness. They wrote memoirs and gave testimony to assist future generation in the task of remembrance and to ensure that the record of what happened could be seen from the victim's perspective. Even today, more than three score years after the Event, survivors continue to compile memoirs and to find ways in which they can be published. These testimonies have taken on an added urgency because survivors are acutely aware that their time

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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