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Thomas Mann und das Judentum (review)

Thomas Mann und das Judentum (review) as opposed to a philosophical temple, he is unable to give an account of the tensions between philosophy and religion in Wittgenstein. There is finally a more complex difficulty that ought to be considered when arguing that Wittgenstein was a religious man. It is the problem of the relation between a philosopher's writings and the philosopher. In Wittgenstein's work we find a world full of religious and non-religious (though rarely anti-religious) gestures. These gestures are his, a point that is excellently made by Peter Winch in Norman Malcolm's Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994, pp. 131­32). And while we may be deeply unsatisfied with an ambiguous conclusion, Wittgenstein's life and work seem to reveal a man who was both religious and not religious. This might have been what Wittgenstein meant when he said to Drury: "I am not a religious man but I cannot help seeing every problem from a religious point of view." Unfortunately, Chatterjee's commitment to a thesis blinds him to this possibility. And yet Chatterjee has written a valuable piece of work. Wittgenstein was undeniably influenced by Jewish tradition. This work explores all of the possible forms that influence may http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

as opposed to a philosophical temple, he is unable to give an account of the tensions between philosophy and religion in Wittgenstein. There is finally a more complex difficulty that ought to be considered when arguing that Wittgenstein was a religious man. It is the problem of the relation between a philosopher's writings and the philosopher. In Wittgenstein's work we find a world full of religious and non-religious (though rarely anti-religious) gestures. These gestures are his, a point that is excellently made by Peter Winch in Norman Malcolm's Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994, pp. 131­32). And while we may be deeply unsatisfied with an ambiguous conclusion, Wittgenstein's life and work seem to reveal a man who was both religious and not religious. This might have been what Wittgenstein meant when he said to Drury: "I am not a religious man but I cannot help seeing every problem from a religious point of view." Unfortunately, Chatterjee's commitment to a thesis blinds him to this possibility. And yet Chatterjee has written a valuable piece of work. Wittgenstein was undeniably influenced by Jewish tradition. This work explores all of the possible forms that influence may

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

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