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Theatre in the Third Reich, the Prewar Years, Essays on Theatre in Nazi Germany (review)

Theatre in the Third Reich, the Prewar Years, Essays on Theatre in Nazi Germany (review) Book Reviews Theatre in the Third Reich, the Prewar Years, Essays on Theatre in Nazi Germany, edited by Glen W. Gadberry. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1995. 187 pp. $55.00. . There were few subjects on which Hitler did not consider himself an expert. This was especially true when it came to cultural affairs. Although his tastes remained quite petit bourgeois-the FUhrer preferred entertainment for its own sake, the kitschier the better-as dictator ofGermany he had to insist on the propagation ofhigh culture, albeit one that would follow the official tribal values of his regime. This imperative was reflected in the politicization of everything from Wagnerian operas (about whose production the FUhrer had fixed opinions) across to classic German drama. But such classical fare was usually performed to certain fixed traditional standards. Therefore, only in the more proletarian genres, such as that ofthe stage review and the cinema, was the regime really able to call the shots, and only here did a universal Hitlerian version of socialist realism really emerge. Shortly after the Nazi accession to power, the FUhrer's Council of United German Culture and Art Organizations was established with Culture Chambers which had the authority to control the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Theatre in the Third Reich, the Prewar Years, Essays on Theatre in Nazi Germany (review)

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Purdue University Press
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Copyright © Purdue University.
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1534-5165
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Abstract

Book Reviews Theatre in the Third Reich, the Prewar Years, Essays on Theatre in Nazi Germany, edited by Glen W. Gadberry. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1995. 187 pp. $55.00. . There were few subjects on which Hitler did not consider himself an expert. This was especially true when it came to cultural affairs. Although his tastes remained quite petit bourgeois-the FUhrer preferred entertainment for its own sake, the kitschier the better-as dictator ofGermany he had to insist on the propagation ofhigh culture, albeit one that would follow the official tribal values of his regime. This imperative was reflected in the politicization of everything from Wagnerian operas (about whose production the FUhrer had fixed opinions) across to classic German drama. But such classical fare was usually performed to certain fixed traditional standards. Therefore, only in the more proletarian genres, such as that ofthe stage review and the cinema, was the regime really able to call the shots, and only here did a universal Hitlerian version of socialist realism really emerge. Shortly after the Nazi accession to power, the FUhrer's Council of United German Culture and Art Organizations was established with Culture Chambers which had the authority to control the

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 2000

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