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The Way Into Encountering God in Judaism (review)

The Way Into Encountering God in Judaism (review) incomprehensibility of God's nature, attributes, and actions in the world. Gillman utilizes theological metaphors in a more liberal, humanistic approach that brings God down to earth, as it were, while at the same time recovering the wonder of divine presence in the universe. He seems to have inherited the theological Book Reviews pragmatism of Mordecai Kaplan while at the same time uncovering the divine pathos expressed so beautifully by Abraham Joshua Heschel. As a result, his book is as much a study of God as it is a study of human discovery and self-exploration. Gillman demonstrates this dual approach to theology in the introduction by claiming that human beings don't "invent" God through metaphors, but rather ". . . discover God and then invent metaphors to characterize the God they experience" (p. 13). Throughout the book, he explores this theme of divine-human interdependence as it is evident in God's nature, attributes, and actions in the world. In the first two chapters, he questions God's nature as being unique and powerful by making these characteristics dependent to some extent upon human awareness of and allegiance to God. In other words, God's allencompassing oneness and power over the universe is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Way Into Encountering God in Judaism (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

incomprehensibility of God's nature, attributes, and actions in the world. Gillman utilizes theological metaphors in a more liberal, humanistic approach that brings God down to earth, as it were, while at the same time recovering the wonder of divine presence in the universe. He seems to have inherited the theological Book Reviews pragmatism of Mordecai Kaplan while at the same time uncovering the divine pathos expressed so beautifully by Abraham Joshua Heschel. As a result, his book is as much a study of God as it is a study of human discovery and self-exploration. Gillman demonstrates this dual approach to theology in the introduction by claiming that human beings don't "invent" God through metaphors, but rather ". . . discover God and then invent metaphors to characterize the God they experience" (p. 13). Throughout the book, he explores this theme of divine-human interdependence as it is evident in God's nature, attributes, and actions in the world. In the first two chapters, he questions God's nature as being unique and powerful by making these characteristics dependent to some extent upon human awareness of and allegiance to God. In other words, God's allencompassing oneness and power over the universe is

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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