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The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism (review)

The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism (review) Paul in a straightforward way without being supersessionist in one's theology regarding Israel, but at least Das attempts, from within the Christian tradition, to avoid this pitfall. Chapter 6, "The Curse of the Mosaic Law" (pp. 141­65), shows again Das's sensitivity to the reliance on grace within first century Judaism that the new perspective on Paul has highlighted. He asserts, however, that such consciousness of grace was simultaneously held with "the demand of God's law for perfect obedience" (p. 145). Das combines the traditionally Lutheran approach and the new perspective to assert that Paul criticizes both the attempt to be righteous by means of the law and the ethnic pride that some law observant people held toward Gentiles (p. 151). Das goes on to assert that "the Law from Paul's vantage point appears to be an entirely negative entity" with no attempt to soften such an assertion with Paul's positive statements regarding the law (Romans 7:12, 14) or his own affirmation of law in certain contexts (1 Corinthians 9:20). Chapter 7, "The Mosaic Law in the Life of the Christian" (pp. 166­86) is Das's attack on the Lutheran position that Paul has no place for the Mosaic law http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Social Roots of Biblical Yahwism (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Paul in a straightforward way without being supersessionist in one's theology regarding Israel, but at least Das attempts, from within the Christian tradition, to avoid this pitfall. Chapter 6, "The Curse of the Mosaic Law" (pp. 141­65), shows again Das's sensitivity to the reliance on grace within first century Judaism that the new perspective on Paul has highlighted. He asserts, however, that such consciousness of grace was simultaneously held with "the demand of God's law for perfect obedience" (p. 145). Das combines the traditionally Lutheran approach and the new perspective to assert that Paul criticizes both the attempt to be righteous by means of the law and the ethnic pride that some law observant people held toward Gentiles (p. 151). Das goes on to assert that "the Law from Paul's vantage point appears to be an entirely negative entity" with no attempt to soften such an assertion with Paul's positive statements regarding the law (Romans 7:12, 14) or his own affirmation of law in certain contexts (1 Corinthians 9:20). Chapter 7, "The Mosaic Law in the Life of the Christian" (pp. 166­86) is Das's attack on the Lutheran position that Paul has no place for the Mosaic law

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

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