The Roads Taken

The Roads Taken Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi Standing in the wood- paneled library at the Yaddo Writers and Artists Retreat on a rainy day in the fall of 1989, I idly browsed the eclectic collection of books that had been placed there by former residents of this haven where solitude, natural beauty, and creature comforts have coaxed the best out of generations of artists. Suddenly, my eye caught a name: Chana Bloch. (The book was, as I recall, The Window, translations with Ariel Bloch of Dahlia Ravikovitch’s poems.) I picked it up and started reading, now in earnest. I knew Ravikovitch’s poetry, or at least I thought I did, until I met it in its English cloak and saw things I had never seen before in the original Hebrew. It was comforting to find a Jewish/Israeli voice among the American cadences in that library—especially as I was working at the time on an essay on the poetry of Dan Pagis and could find no echo, in that majestic retreat, of his German- accented and Holocaust- ine fl cted Hebrew lines. But all the while, the name of the translator and the tim- bre of her voice were testing my brain and a synapsis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165

Abstract

Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi Standing in the wood- paneled library at the Yaddo Writers and Artists Retreat on a rainy day in the fall of 1989, I idly browsed the eclectic collection of books that had been placed there by former residents of this haven where solitude, natural beauty, and creature comforts have coaxed the best out of generations of artists. Suddenly, my eye caught a name: Chana Bloch. (The book was, as I recall, The Window, translations with Ariel Bloch of Dahlia Ravikovitch’s poems.) I picked it up and started reading, now in earnest. I knew Ravikovitch’s poetry, or at least I thought I did, until I met it in its English cloak and saw things I had never seen before in the original Hebrew. It was comforting to find a Jewish/Israeli voice among the American cadences in that library—especially as I was working at the time on an essay on the poetry of Dan Pagis and could find no echo, in that majestic retreat, of his German- accented and Holocaust- ine fl cted Hebrew lines. But all the while, the name of the translator and the tim- bre of her voice were testing my brain and a synapsis

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Aug 7, 2018

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