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The Road to Power: Herut Party in Israel (review)

The Road to Power: Herut Party in Israel (review) SHOFAR Worschech draws a distinction between the nomadic population of eastern Palestine and the more urbanized western Palestine natives still under the aegis of the Egyptians. The author conjectures that when the Egyptians transferred their interest to the more sparsely settled territory in eastern Palestine, the Shasu people developed into a more sedentary society. He then speculates that one of the sheiks from eastern Palestine became the nrst king of Moab. Drawing on the works of K. A. Kitchen, the author believes that the sudden appearance of forts and villages in Central Moab was due to Egyptian foreign policy. In fact, he reiterates, Central Moab remained intact into the Persian period, not wishing to nght stronger opponents until 649 H.C.E. when nomadic Arab tribes overtook the area. Through the artifacts gained during many years of digging, Worschech is able, at least partialIy, to explain how and why the central Moab reagion was settled. It would be difficult to imagine a more thorough discussion of the relics and geography of the area, yet if there is a criticism it is that the book is too specialized. Not knowing much about Iron Age settlements, I would have appreciated some more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Road to Power: Herut Party in Israel (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

SHOFAR Worschech draws a distinction between the nomadic population of eastern Palestine and the more urbanized western Palestine natives still under the aegis of the Egyptians. The author conjectures that when the Egyptians transferred their interest to the more sparsely settled territory in eastern Palestine, the Shasu people developed into a more sedentary society. He then speculates that one of the sheiks from eastern Palestine became the nrst king of Moab. Drawing on the works of K. A. Kitchen, the author believes that the sudden appearance of forts and villages in Central Moab was due to Egyptian foreign policy. In fact, he reiterates, Central Moab remained intact into the Persian period, not wishing to nght stronger opponents until 649 H.C.E. when nomadic Arab tribes overtook the area. Through the artifacts gained during many years of digging, Worschech is able, at least partialIy, to explain how and why the central Moab reagion was settled. It would be difficult to imagine a more thorough discussion of the relics and geography of the area, yet if there is a criticism it is that the book is too specialized. Not knowing much about Iron Age settlements, I would have appreciated some more

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1992

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