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The Philosopher-King in Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Thought (review)

The Philosopher-King in Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Thought (review) SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 theological trends such as medieval Kabbalah and post-Holocaust and feminist theologies. While discussing the redemptive myth of Lurianic Kabbalah, Gillman fails to describe the mystical theosophy of the Zohar that is integral to understanding the development of Jewish theology in history. To his credit, Gillman does address the allimportant topic of post-Holocaust theology, yet he does not sufficiently represent the diversity of perspectives in this genre and the pervasive tension that exists between what Zachary Braiterman in (God) after Auschwitz (1998) describes as theodicy vs. antitheodicy, the defense or rejection of God in the face of evil. Finally, while he appropriately recognizes the recent development of Jewish feminist God language, Gillman omits a discussion of already existing feminine images of God in biblical, rabbinic, and kabbalistic sources and the wide-ranging opinions among various feminists, both male and female, about this issue. Moreover, it is often difficult to locate primary sources because the documentation is somewhat inconsistent, incomplete, and at times nonexistent. It appears that at certain points in the book, Gillman gives the reader too much or too little credit by either assuming that the reader is aware of many of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Philosopher-King in Medieval and Renaissance Jewish Thought (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 theological trends such as medieval Kabbalah and post-Holocaust and feminist theologies. While discussing the redemptive myth of Lurianic Kabbalah, Gillman fails to describe the mystical theosophy of the Zohar that is integral to understanding the development of Jewish theology in history. To his credit, Gillman does address the allimportant topic of post-Holocaust theology, yet he does not sufficiently represent the diversity of perspectives in this genre and the pervasive tension that exists between what Zachary Braiterman in (God) after Auschwitz (1998) describes as theodicy vs. antitheodicy, the defense or rejection of God in the face of evil. Finally, while he appropriately recognizes the recent development of Jewish feminist God language, Gillman omits a discussion of already existing feminine images of God in biblical, rabbinic, and kabbalistic sources and the wide-ranging opinions among various feminists, both male and female, about this issue. Moreover, it is often difficult to locate primary sources because the documentation is somewhat inconsistent, incomplete, and at times nonexistent. It appears that at certain points in the book, Gillman gives the reader too much or too little credit by either assuming that the reader is aware of many of

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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