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The Modernity of Others: Jewish Anti-Catholicism in Germany and France by Ari Joskowicz (review)

The Modernity of Others: Jewish Anti-Catholicism in Germany and France by Ari Joskowicz (review) 126 | films on the Holocaust without any Jews, or to make the films "less Jewish." The painful price of making a film that did not find favor with the authorities is related in chapter 11. In a heart-rending homage, the author discusses her selection of a still photograph of the filming of the drowning scene from Eastern Corridor (1966) for the book jacket. How filmmakers addressed tensions between the Communist and Western Blocs, and the Soviet Union's turning its back on Israel and Zionism, which left the Jews behind the Iron Curtain as hostages and unwanted objects of suspicion on the silver screen, is told in chapter 13. Gershenson describes the repeated attempts to find the "correct formula" for writing an alternative script to be approved, as in chapters 14 and 15, and sets forth a detailed description of the years following Perestroika until the present. In conclusion, we may say that Gershenson's extraordinary book is a masterpiece of research on previously utterly unknown aspects of the Holocaust of the Jews in the USSR. For those of us who teach about the Holocaust of the Jews of Europe in academia--and there are surely many of us reading http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Modernity of Others: Jewish Anti-Catholicism in Germany and France by Ari Joskowicz (review)

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Purdue University Press
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Copyright © Purdue University.
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1534-5165
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Abstract

126 | films on the Holocaust without any Jews, or to make the films "less Jewish." The painful price of making a film that did not find favor with the authorities is related in chapter 11. In a heart-rending homage, the author discusses her selection of a still photograph of the filming of the drowning scene from Eastern Corridor (1966) for the book jacket. How filmmakers addressed tensions between the Communist and Western Blocs, and the Soviet Union's turning its back on Israel and Zionism, which left the Jews behind the Iron Curtain as hostages and unwanted objects of suspicion on the silver screen, is told in chapter 13. Gershenson describes the repeated attempts to find the "correct formula" for writing an alternative script to be approved, as in chapters 14 and 15, and sets forth a detailed description of the years following Perestroika until the present. In conclusion, we may say that Gershenson's extraordinary book is a masterpiece of research on previously utterly unknown aspects of the Holocaust of the Jews in the USSR. For those of us who teach about the Holocaust of the Jews of Europe in academia--and there are surely many of us reading

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jun 28, 2014

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