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The Israeli Peace Movement: A Shattered Dream (review)

The Israeli Peace Movement: A Shattered Dream (review) pressure on Israel on this issue peaked in the first days of the Yom Kippur War, when Israel was in desperate need of U.S. military aid (p. 39). The Israeli government understood that despite its wish to see the amendment pass--which would increase Jewish immigration from the Soviet Union--it would be unwise to enter into direct confrontation with the U.S. administration on the issue. Israel's diplomatic representatives throughout the world were therefore explicitly instructed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to conduct no formal discussions on this subject. In light of this state of affairs, the struggle to pass the amendment was mostly conducted by the Jewish organizations in the United States (pp. 39­40). Eventually, despite the administration's efforts, the amendment was accepted on October 18, 1974, and became law on January 3, 1975. Kochavi's book, despite its small size, is one of the first books dealing with U.S.-Israeli relationships during the Nixon administration based on recently declassified archival materials. It is hence an important book. It is to be expected that additional studies in this field will be published in the coming years which will expand our knowledge of this important period in U.S.-Israeli relationships. Boaz Vanetik http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

The Israeli Peace Movement: A Shattered Dream (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

pressure on Israel on this issue peaked in the first days of the Yom Kippur War, when Israel was in desperate need of U.S. military aid (p. 39). The Israeli government understood that despite its wish to see the amendment pass--which would increase Jewish immigration from the Soviet Union--it would be unwise to enter into direct confrontation with the U.S. administration on the issue. Israel's diplomatic representatives throughout the world were therefore explicitly instructed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to conduct no formal discussions on this subject. In light of this state of affairs, the struggle to pass the amendment was mostly conducted by the Jewish organizations in the United States (pp. 39­40). Eventually, despite the administration's efforts, the amendment was accepted on October 18, 1974, and became law on January 3, 1975. Kochavi's book, despite its small size, is one of the first books dealing with U.S.-Israeli relationships during the Nixon administration based on recently declassified archival materials. It is hence an important book. It is to be expected that additional studies in this field will be published in the coming years which will expand our knowledge of this important period in U.S.-Israeli relationships. Boaz Vanetik

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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