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The Dead Sea Scrolls after Fifty Years

The Dead Sea Scrolls after Fifty Years SHOFAR Summer 1999 Vo!. 17, No.4 Review Essay David S. Williams University of Georgia Introduction The fIrst of the Dead Sea Scrolls to be discovered were found by an Arab shepherd in a cave in the Judaean desert in late 1946 or early 1947. Archaeologists and Bedouin found additional caves containing scrolls beginning in 1951, and the site which was eventually determined to be associated with the community behind the scrolls-Khirbet Qumran (located at the northwest end of the Dead Sea, about 8 miles south of Jericho}-was fIrst excavated by archaeologists in that same year. Thus, we have now reached a period of time that marks an approximate fIfty-year point from the overall discoveries related to the scrolls. In an earlier publication in this journal ("Teaching the Dead Sea Scrolls," Shofar 14 [1996]: 76-95), I provided an overview of introductory matters connected with the scrolls: (1) the discoveries of the scrolls and the Qumran excavations; (2) the dating of the scrolls; (3) the nature of the scroll library; (4) the theology of the scrolls; (5) the identifIcation of the Qumran community; (6) the signifIcance of the scrolls; (7) the scrolls and early Christianity; and (8) controversies surrounding the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Purdue University Press
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1534-5165
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Abstract

SHOFAR Summer 1999 Vo!. 17, No.4 Review Essay David S. Williams University of Georgia Introduction The fIrst of the Dead Sea Scrolls to be discovered were found by an Arab shepherd in a cave in the Judaean desert in late 1946 or early 1947. Archaeologists and Bedouin found additional caves containing scrolls beginning in 1951, and the site which was eventually determined to be associated with the community behind the scrolls-Khirbet Qumran (located at the northwest end of the Dead Sea, about 8 miles south of Jericho}-was fIrst excavated by archaeologists in that same year. Thus, we have now reached a period of time that marks an approximate fIfty-year point from the overall discoveries related to the scrolls. In an earlier publication in this journal ("Teaching the Dead Sea Scrolls," Shofar 14 [1996]: 76-95), I provided an overview of introductory matters connected with the scrolls: (1) the discoveries of the scrolls and the Qumran excavations; (2) the dating of the scrolls; (3) the nature of the scroll library; (4) the theology of the scrolls; (5) the identifIcation of the Qumran community; (6) the signifIcance of the scrolls; (7) the scrolls and early Christianity; and (8) controversies surrounding the

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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