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The Cantor-Poets: Review Essay

The Cantor-Poets: Review Essay The Cantor-Poets Review Essay by Ephraim Nissan eMS, University of Greenwich, London A. A Lifetime's Quest For Early Hymnography The Fathers of Piyyut: Texts and Studies Toward a History of the Piyyut in Eretz Israel, by Shalom Spiegel. Selected from his literary estate and edited by Menahem H. Schmelzer. New York and Jerusalem: The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1996. Hebrew, 434 pp.; English introduction, 10 pp. $28.00 (c) ISBN 965-456-020-8. In the awareness, by the educated Jewish public, of the piyyut, i.e., Jewish hymnography, I it is especially the classic, much celebrated Golden Age of Hebrew poetry in Spain, in the 11th to 13th centuries, that catches the eye. 2 When that Golden Age eventually started to unfold, it did so with such poets-e.g., Samuel the Nagid (Vizier), or that proud youngster resenting him, the giant Ibn Gabirol-who were endowed with a taste and aesthetic conceptions quite unsimilar to what used to be mainstream during the previous several generations of authors in Spain itself, or the traditionally related Maghreb, or everywhere else for that matter. Poetry of both the old and new traditions included secular compositions as well as hymns: poems as religious themes. Hebrew hymns are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Purdue University Press
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1534-5165
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Abstract

The Cantor-Poets Review Essay by Ephraim Nissan eMS, University of Greenwich, London A. A Lifetime's Quest For Early Hymnography The Fathers of Piyyut: Texts and Studies Toward a History of the Piyyut in Eretz Israel, by Shalom Spiegel. Selected from his literary estate and edited by Menahem H. Schmelzer. New York and Jerusalem: The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1996. Hebrew, 434 pp.; English introduction, 10 pp. $28.00 (c) ISBN 965-456-020-8. In the awareness, by the educated Jewish public, of the piyyut, i.e., Jewish hymnography, I it is especially the classic, much celebrated Golden Age of Hebrew poetry in Spain, in the 11th to 13th centuries, that catches the eye. 2 When that Golden Age eventually started to unfold, it did so with such poets-e.g., Samuel the Nagid (Vizier), or that proud youngster resenting him, the giant Ibn Gabirol-who were endowed with a taste and aesthetic conceptions quite unsimilar to what used to be mainstream during the previous several generations of authors in Spain itself, or the traditionally related Maghreb, or everywhere else for that matter. Poetry of both the old and new traditions included secular compositions as well as hymns: poems as religious themes. Hebrew hymns are

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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