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The Beast Reawakens (review)

The Beast Reawakens (review) Book Reviews antisemitism; it was also "German" antisemitism, the perpetuation of an antisemitism that had its roots in prewar Germany. Herf makes his case convincing by identifying resonances of antisemitic KPD ideology from the 1920s in the writings of Ulbricht and other East German leaders. East Germany's relative reluctance to remember ("relative," that is, to West Germany's openness), "the division of memory in postwar Germany" cannot be explained in terms of geo-political pressures alone. The memory of politics was also at work here. Divided Memory is lucidly written and forcefully argued. It is a searching, comprehensive study that tracks German responses to Nazism from the Weimar Republic to contemporary Germany. And yet despite its expansive breadth, Divided Memory delivers thoughtful and thorough readings of many individual texts and events, from early KPD manifestos to the recent historians' debate on the particularity of the Holocaust and Stasi files that have only just become accessible. But the focus of Herfs book is the early cold war era. As his title suggests, the central question here is that of the division of memory in a divided Germany. What makes his book a success is that it offers a fresh and persuasive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews antisemitism; it was also "German" antisemitism, the perpetuation of an antisemitism that had its roots in prewar Germany. Herf makes his case convincing by identifying resonances of antisemitic KPD ideology from the 1920s in the writings of Ulbricht and other East German leaders. East Germany's relative reluctance to remember ("relative," that is, to West Germany's openness), "the division of memory in postwar Germany" cannot be explained in terms of geo-political pressures alone. The memory of politics was also at work here. Divided Memory is lucidly written and forcefully argued. It is a searching, comprehensive study that tracks German responses to Nazism from the Weimar Republic to contemporary Germany. And yet despite its expansive breadth, Divided Memory delivers thoughtful and thorough readings of many individual texts and events, from early KPD manifestos to the recent historians' debate on the particularity of the Holocaust and Stasi files that have only just become accessible. But the focus of Herfs book is the early cold war era. As his title suggests, the central question here is that of the division of memory in a divided Germany. What makes his book a success is that it offers a fresh and persuasive

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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