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Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany (review)

Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany (review) a central object in Nazi Germany, and not a mere by-product of social, economical, national, or accidental elements. Without belittling the importance of the above, the most fascinating aspect of the book is the location of the trial within the Israeli context of the time. I do not recall any other book about the Eichmann trial which does just that. At times I even wondered what is this book more about, Israel or the trial. I assume this has to do with Mulisch's complex identity. Israel is described as extremely dynamic, industrious, "total lack of luxury, but not poverty. It is the atmosphere of a Communist country, but without the pressure that poisons life. . . . In short, this is the most agreeable atmosphere imaginable, currently to be found elsewhere. . . ." (p. 44). However to an Israeli who read this book in 2007 it was a journey full of curiosity accompanied with deep sorrow, in view of the great promise that was embedded in the Israel of the early 1960s--mortified yet so successful. Hanna Yablonka Department of Jewish History Ben Gurion University of the Negev Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany, by Alan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

a central object in Nazi Germany, and not a mere by-product of social, economical, national, or accidental elements. Without belittling the importance of the above, the most fascinating aspect of the book is the location of the trial within the Israeli context of the time. I do not recall any other book about the Eichmann trial which does just that. At times I even wondered what is this book more about, Israel or the trial. I assume this has to do with Mulisch's complex identity. Israel is described as extremely dynamic, industrious, "total lack of luxury, but not poverty. It is the atmosphere of a Communist country, but without the pressure that poisons life. . . . In short, this is the most agreeable atmosphere imaginable, currently to be found elsewhere. . . ." (p. 44). However to an Israeli who read this book in 2007 it was a journey full of curiosity accompanied with deep sorrow, in view of the great promise that was embedded in the Israel of the early 1960s--mortified yet so successful. Hanna Yablonka Department of Jewish History Ben Gurion University of the Negev Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany, by Alan

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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