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Spontaneity in Teaching: Incorporating Current Vatican Publications on the Jews into a Course on Modern Judaism

Spontaneity in Teaching: Incorporating Current Vatican Publications on the Jews into a Course on... Miriam Dean-Otting Kenyon College I teach a course on Modem Judaism which serves as both an introduction to Judaism and a survey of modem Jewish thought. After laying a biblical and rabbinic foundation and introducing students to ideas of the Sabbath, festival and holy day cycle, we spend the rest of the semester tracing the development of the branches and the varieties of Zionism. I also incorporate a brief look at Jewish feminism. In past years I have spent a few sessions as well on Jewish-Christian Relations. In that section I have the students read Martin Luther, "On the Jews and their Lies," the Second Vatican Council's "Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions," and Susannah Heschel's "Anti-Judaism in Christian Feminst Theology." While I do not keep track of such things, I can usually count on half the class enrollment being Jewish students from various backgrounds. I studiously avoid teaching about the Holocaust in this course. Although I struggle with this decision and have found that I have been criticized for this by some students over the years, I do this primarily for two reasons. One is that we have a whole course devoted to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Spontaneity in Teaching: Incorporating Current Vatican Publications on the Jews into a Course on Modern Judaism

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
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Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

Miriam Dean-Otting Kenyon College I teach a course on Modem Judaism which serves as both an introduction to Judaism and a survey of modem Jewish thought. After laying a biblical and rabbinic foundation and introducing students to ideas of the Sabbath, festival and holy day cycle, we spend the rest of the semester tracing the development of the branches and the varieties of Zionism. I also incorporate a brief look at Jewish feminism. In past years I have spent a few sessions as well on Jewish-Christian Relations. In that section I have the students read Martin Luther, "On the Jews and their Lies," the Second Vatican Council's "Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions," and Susannah Heschel's "Anti-Judaism in Christian Feminst Theology." While I do not keep track of such things, I can usually count on half the class enrollment being Jewish students from various backgrounds. I studiously avoid teaching about the Holocaust in this course. Although I struggle with this decision and have found that I have been criticized for this by some students over the years, I do this primarily for two reasons. One is that we have a whole course devoted to

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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