Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

"Soul"

"Soul" Jeffrey Melnick Babson College Sometime in the mid-1990s, Steve Bernstein was asked by John Zorn to make a record for Zorn's Radical Jewish Culture series. Bernstein is a downtown New York avant-garde jazz trumpeter and bandleader--a member of John Lurie's Lounge Lizard's and leader of his own Sex Mob--a group that specializes in free jazz versions of James Bond theme songs and covers of Abba and Prince. Bernstein explains that he was initially puzzled by Zorn's invitation. He writes in the liner notes to Diaspora Soul, the record he finally made for Zorn: "I was left with an enigmatic question. How does a Jewish musician who has spent his life studying `other' musical cultures make a `Jewish' record, when, by nature, all of one's music is already `Jewish'?" Bernstein, by his own account, struggled for three years with this question, and then finally had what he calls his "Gulf Coast epiphany": "I had been doing a lot of reading and listening for the past few months to the music of New Orleans, and had been developing a theory about the evolution of New Orleans marching band music not into what we call jazz, but into rhythm and blues."1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/soul-ChP2Q2fSew
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jeffrey Melnick Babson College Sometime in the mid-1990s, Steve Bernstein was asked by John Zorn to make a record for Zorn's Radical Jewish Culture series. Bernstein is a downtown New York avant-garde jazz trumpeter and bandleader--a member of John Lurie's Lounge Lizard's and leader of his own Sex Mob--a group that specializes in free jazz versions of James Bond theme songs and covers of Abba and Prince. Bernstein explains that he was initially puzzled by Zorn's invitation. He writes in the liner notes to Diaspora Soul, the record he finally made for Zorn: "I was left with an enigmatic question. How does a Jewish musician who has spent his life studying `other' musical cultures make a `Jewish' record, when, by nature, all of one's music is already `Jewish'?" Bernstein, by his own account, struggled for three years with this question, and then finally had what he calls his "Gulf Coast epiphany": "I had been doing a lot of reading and listening for the past few months to the music of New Orleans, and had been developing a theory about the evolution of New Orleans marching band music not into what we call jazz, but into rhythm and blues."1

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

There are no references for this article.