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Shira (review)

Shira (review) SHOFAR Shira, by S. Y. Agnon, translated by Zeva Shapiro, afterword by Robert Alter. New York: Schocken Books, 1989. 585 pp. $24.95. Not many statements are as banal or nearly robbed of meaning as those which connect love with pain, lust with sorrow. "There are no happy loves," laments with touching charm the well-known French chansonnier George Brassens. However, banality may be phrased in faded, ragged rhetoric, but it is not necessarily void of truth. The Song of Songs is no less the Love of Loves, is no less the Pain of Pains. "By night on my bed I sought him whom my soul loves; I sought him, but I found him not; I will rise now, and go about the city in the streets, and in the broad ways I will seek him whom my soul loves; I sought him but I found him not" (Song of Songs, II, 1-2). Time cannot diminish the power of interlaced love and pain in that verse. Shira is a novel about the pain of love, about the destructive power of forbidden love, about the agony, humiliation, and deterioration with which love curses its chastised, doomed carrier. Once the novel's protagonist, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Shira, by S. Y. Agnon, translated by Zeva Shapiro, afterword by Robert Alter. New York: Schocken Books, 1989. 585 pp. $24.95. Not many statements are as banal or nearly robbed of meaning as those which connect love with pain, lust with sorrow. "There are no happy loves," laments with touching charm the well-known French chansonnier George Brassens. However, banality may be phrased in faded, ragged rhetoric, but it is not necessarily void of truth. The Song of Songs is no less the Love of Loves, is no less the Pain of Pains. "By night on my bed I sought him whom my soul loves; I sought him, but I found him not; I will rise now, and go about the city in the streets, and in the broad ways I will seek him whom my soul loves; I sought him but I found him not" (Song of Songs, II, 1-2). Time cannot diminish the power of interlaced love and pain in that verse. Shira is a novel about the pain of love, about the destructive power of forbidden love, about the agony, humiliation, and deterioration with which love curses its chastised, doomed carrier. Once the novel's protagonist,

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1990

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