Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television (review)

Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television (review) sympathy for his view, given the rigidity of most Orthodox rabbis in keeping out people who want to be Jews, marry Jews, and adopt Jewish practices. But when Professor Kunin says that "[h]istorical authenticity . . . is outside the scope of this study," one wonders what the whole discussion is about. He claims that "some ancestors of individuals who claim to be Crypto-Jews were of Jewish descent and, in some cases, were called before the Inquisition on charges of Judaizing." But how do we know this? Do some Crypto-Jews have reliable family trees? While he accepts that there is a gap of two hundred years in the records (actually over 250 years since the hunt for Judaizers ceased, quite a long time before the abolition of the Holy Office itself ), and that very few if any people can identify an ancestor tried by the Inquisition, Professor Kunin writes that it is "highly plausible" that traditions of identity could have been passed down and thereby form the basis of the modern expression of CryptoJewish identity and culture. It may be so in some cases, but the argument is so hedged about with "ifs" and "buts" and "mays" http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/screening-a-lynching-the-leo-frank-case-on-film-and-television-review-yjt05bbZEK
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

sympathy for his view, given the rigidity of most Orthodox rabbis in keeping out people who want to be Jews, marry Jews, and adopt Jewish practices. But when Professor Kunin says that "[h]istorical authenticity . . . is outside the scope of this study," one wonders what the whole discussion is about. He claims that "some ancestors of individuals who claim to be Crypto-Jews were of Jewish descent and, in some cases, were called before the Inquisition on charges of Judaizing." But how do we know this? Do some Crypto-Jews have reliable family trees? While he accepts that there is a gap of two hundred years in the records (actually over 250 years since the hunt for Judaizers ceased, quite a long time before the abolition of the Holy Office itself ), and that very few if any people can identify an ancestor tried by the Inquisition, Professor Kunin writes that it is "highly plausible" that traditions of identity could have been passed down and thereby form the basis of the modern expression of CryptoJewish identity and culture. It may be so in some cases, but the argument is so hedged about with "ifs" and "buts" and "mays"

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2011

There are no references for this article.