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Reading the Women of the Bible (review)

Reading the Women of the Bible (review) SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 parallels, dates from the first century CE), why now? What makes it suddenly important to invoke this "wider Greco-Roman conversation" in the Amoraic period? For Jaffee, the phenomenon is "thoroughly intelligible on the basis of the internal needs" of the rabbis and "their own discipleship circles" (p. 152). I would suggest that the traditional linkage of the doctrine of Oral Torah with the more specific and polemical conversation with emergent Christianity (pp. 144­46) has more relevance to the problem than Jaffee will allow. Loveday Alexander Professor of Biblical Studies University of Sheffield Reading the Women of the Bible: A New Interpretation of Their Stories, by Tikva Frymer-Kensky. New York: Schocken Books, 2002. 446 pp. $28.95. In her lucid and accessible new book, Tikva Frymer-Kensky applies her skills as a deeply learned biblical scholar, her training as an Assyriologist, and her personal approach as "a feminist who loves the Bible" to an original and elucidating study of representations of women in Hebrew Scriptures. Frymer-Kensky does not apologize for the fact that the Hebrew Bible, an androcentric text written by men about male matters, reflects a patriarchal society in which women had limited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 parallels, dates from the first century CE), why now? What makes it suddenly important to invoke this "wider Greco-Roman conversation" in the Amoraic period? For Jaffee, the phenomenon is "thoroughly intelligible on the basis of the internal needs" of the rabbis and "their own discipleship circles" (p. 152). I would suggest that the traditional linkage of the doctrine of Oral Torah with the more specific and polemical conversation with emergent Christianity (pp. 144­46) has more relevance to the problem than Jaffee will allow. Loveday Alexander Professor of Biblical Studies University of Sheffield Reading the Women of the Bible: A New Interpretation of Their Stories, by Tikva Frymer-Kensky. New York: Schocken Books, 2002. 446 pp. $28.95. In her lucid and accessible new book, Tikva Frymer-Kensky applies her skills as a deeply learned biblical scholar, her training as an Assyriologist, and her personal approach as "a feminist who loves the Bible" to an original and elucidating study of representations of women in Hebrew Scriptures. Frymer-Kensky does not apologize for the fact that the Hebrew Bible, an androcentric text written by men about male matters, reflects a patriarchal society in which women had limited

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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