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Reading Dostoyevsky Post-Holocaust

Reading Dostoyevsky Post-Holocaust Dostoyevsky and the Holocaust DRAMATIC ENDEAVOR: by Gary Adelman Gary Adelman is Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated at the University of Michigan and Columbia University. His books include studies of Conrad, Tolstoy, and D. H. Lawrence, as well as a novel, Honey out o/Stone. - Background Note This piece is part of a larger work on Dostoyevsky which confronts the problem of how to read this flawed genius in our post-Holocaust world. Dostoyevsky died in January 1881, a month or so after completing The Brothers Karamazov. The year before he began the novel, his antisemitism, crudely visceral in his personal correspondence, flared up in his journalism. At the time, 1876-1877, he had become a by-word in Russia with A Writer's Diary, a monthly magazine he authored alone and which had a remarkable press run of six thousand copies. He devoted the March 1877 issue to replying to letters he received from Jews criticizing him for antisemitism. His reply is insultingly facetious and largely consists of his repeating two of the oldest and most persistent calumnies-that the Jews brought misery on themselves by being unassimilable, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dostoyevsky and the Holocaust DRAMATIC ENDEAVOR: by Gary Adelman Gary Adelman is Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated at the University of Michigan and Columbia University. His books include studies of Conrad, Tolstoy, and D. H. Lawrence, as well as a novel, Honey out o/Stone. - Background Note This piece is part of a larger work on Dostoyevsky which confronts the problem of how to read this flawed genius in our post-Holocaust world. Dostoyevsky died in January 1881, a month or so after completing The Brothers Karamazov. The year before he began the novel, his antisemitism, crudely visceral in his personal correspondence, flared up in his journalism. At the time, 1876-1877, he had become a by-word in Russia with A Writer's Diary, a monthly magazine he authored alone and which had a remarkable press run of six thousand copies. He devoted the March 1877 issue to replying to letters he received from Jews criticizing him for antisemitism. His reply is insultingly facetious and largely consists of his repeating two of the oldest and most persistent calumnies-that the Jews brought misery on themselves by being unassimilable,

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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