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Psychotherapy in the Third Reich: The Göring Institute (review)

Psychotherapy in the Third Reich: The Göring Institute (review) Book Reviews less than seven percent of North American Jewry. Inclusion of at least some Conservative and Reform rabbinic rulings would thus have made this volume a more accurate reflection of the field of Jewish bioethics. As it is, I worry that non-Jews-and even some Jews-will mistake Zohar's treatment of these issues-and that of other Orthodox writers-as the only possible ones, which they most certainly are not. As Louis Newman has pointed out,2 any reading of the Jewish tradition on bioethics-or, for that matter, on any subject-ean legitimately claim to be only a reading of Judaism on the subject, not Judaism's view, plain and simple. Second, on a number of occasions Zohar gets very close to striking out in new directions of his own on particular issues, but he always pulls back, suggesting only that others might fruitfully consider the direction in which he has pointed in making their decisions in Jewish law. I appreciate his respect for his elders and his reluctance to take the responsibility for specific decisions, but I nevertheless wish that he had taken that next step. This book is, after all, an immensely helpful view of the theoretical alternatives in bioethics with some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Psychotherapy in the Third Reich: The Göring Institute (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews less than seven percent of North American Jewry. Inclusion of at least some Conservative and Reform rabbinic rulings would thus have made this volume a more accurate reflection of the field of Jewish bioethics. As it is, I worry that non-Jews-and even some Jews-will mistake Zohar's treatment of these issues-and that of other Orthodox writers-as the only possible ones, which they most certainly are not. As Louis Newman has pointed out,2 any reading of the Jewish tradition on bioethics-or, for that matter, on any subject-ean legitimately claim to be only a reading of Judaism on the subject, not Judaism's view, plain and simple. Second, on a number of occasions Zohar gets very close to striking out in new directions of his own on particular issues, but he always pulls back, suggesting only that others might fruitfully consider the direction in which he has pointed in making their decisions in Jewish law. I appreciate his respect for his elders and his reluctance to take the responsibility for specific decisions, but I nevertheless wish that he had taken that next step. This book is, after all, an immensely helpful view of the theoretical alternatives in bioethics with some

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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