Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Pious and Rebellious: Jewish Women in Medieval Europe (review)

Pious and Rebellious: Jewish Women in Medieval Europe (review) the volume, are an outgrowth of the final section of Standing Again at Sinai and of Plaskow's interest in publishing works in which she makes the connections between her own experience of coming out as a lesbian in the Jewish community and the Jewish feminist theology she has created. These essays contribute a bold and clear lesbian and feminist perspective to the ongoing project of rethinking Jewish sexual ethics. Plaskow's introductory essay gives the reader a good sense of her own understanding of the progress and meaning of her work within contemporary Jewish thought. But her work is also a reflection of late twentieth-century American Jewish history, and I would have liked to see a greater effort at contextualizing her work and her influence in this history. At the very least, each essay might have included a brief paragraph containing information about the publication venue. The works in the first section, for example, were part of the key conferences and foundational anthologies that created Jewish feminism in the 1970s, events and publications unknown to many undergraduates today. Nevertheless, students of contemporary theology, Jewish feminism, and women's studies will find this a valuable resource that provides an overview of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Pious and Rebellious: Jewish Women in Medieval Europe (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/pious-and-rebellious-jewish-women-in-medieval-europe-review-J1TtrpUvAA
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the volume, are an outgrowth of the final section of Standing Again at Sinai and of Plaskow's interest in publishing works in which she makes the connections between her own experience of coming out as a lesbian in the Jewish community and the Jewish feminist theology she has created. These essays contribute a bold and clear lesbian and feminist perspective to the ongoing project of rethinking Jewish sexual ethics. Plaskow's introductory essay gives the reader a good sense of her own understanding of the progress and meaning of her work within contemporary Jewish thought. But her work is also a reflection of late twentieth-century American Jewish history, and I would have liked to see a greater effort at contextualizing her work and her influence in this history. At the very least, each essay might have included a brief paragraph containing information about the publication venue. The works in the first section, for example, were part of the key conferences and foundational anthologies that created Jewish feminism in the 1970s, events and publications unknown to many undergraduates today. Nevertheless, students of contemporary theology, Jewish feminism, and women's studies will find this a valuable resource that provides an overview of

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

There are no references for this article.