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Pedagogy and Archaeology: How Students "Dig" the Web

Pedagogy and Archaeology: How Students "Dig" the Web Julye Bidmead Vanderbilt University Can the Internet and computer technology play any role in teaching Biblical Studies? In this world of virtual reality students enrolled in Vanderbilt University's Religious Studies 106, "The Hebrew Bible and its Interpretations," excavated an ancient biblical city from behind their computer screens. Technology, archaeology, and biblical interpretation commingled in the cleverly entitled I Dig Gezer, the first interactive archaeological Web-based module to be used at Vanderbilt University. This paper will address some of the pedagogical issues involved in the development, design, and presentation of computer teaching modules, such as why and how this program was developed, the context in which it was taught, a brief overview of the module, and a summary of its results in an actual classroom situation. The initial conception of the project was based on the "choose your own adventure game." With that framework in mind we designed a unique Web project where students would work through a computer program which modeled an archaeological excavation. The assignment and computer project had several goals, namely for the students to understand archaeology, its tools and ambiguities, how history is "pieced" together from archaeological information, and archaeology's contribution to biblical studies and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Pedagogy and Archaeology: How Students "Dig" the Web

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Julye Bidmead Vanderbilt University Can the Internet and computer technology play any role in teaching Biblical Studies? In this world of virtual reality students enrolled in Vanderbilt University's Religious Studies 106, "The Hebrew Bible and its Interpretations," excavated an ancient biblical city from behind their computer screens. Technology, archaeology, and biblical interpretation commingled in the cleverly entitled I Dig Gezer, the first interactive archaeological Web-based module to be used at Vanderbilt University. This paper will address some of the pedagogical issues involved in the development, design, and presentation of computer teaching modules, such as why and how this program was developed, the context in which it was taught, a brief overview of the module, and a summary of its results in an actual classroom situation. The initial conception of the project was based on the "choose your own adventure game." With that framework in mind we designed a unique Web project where students would work through a computer program which modeled an archaeological excavation. The assignment and computer project had several goals, namely for the students to understand archaeology, its tools and ambiguities, how history is "pieced" together from archaeological information, and archaeology's contribution to biblical studies and

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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