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Paul and the Jews (review)

Paul and the Jews (review) ship. It remains to be seen whether the growing neo-conservative influence in contemporary Catholicism will alter Greenberg's staunch optimism about the value of the theological dialogue. In a plenary address at the annual meeting of the International Council of Christians & Jews in July 2005 in Chicago the optimism still seemed present despite his expressed concern about the Dulles presentation in Washington. In conclusion, I would only raise two critical points regarding Greenberg's theology. The first is his insistence that the path to a more constructive Christian-Jewish theology lies in the abandonment of the Christian proclamation as God Incarnate. I would actually argue the contrary, though I recognize that Incarnationalism requires some redefinition. In my judgment, a view shared by other Christian theologians in the dialogue, Incarnationalism provides a more productive path for a new Christian theology of Judaism than the classical Death/Resurrection theology. And secondly, Greenberg will need to find a way of relating better his theology of the Christian-Jewish relationship to the wider dialogue of religions, particularly Islam. John T. Pawlikowski Catholic Theological Union Chicago Paul and the Jews, by A. Andrew Das. Library of Pauline Studies. Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson, 2003. 238 pp. $24.95. This is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

ship. It remains to be seen whether the growing neo-conservative influence in contemporary Catholicism will alter Greenberg's staunch optimism about the value of the theological dialogue. In a plenary address at the annual meeting of the International Council of Christians & Jews in July 2005 in Chicago the optimism still seemed present despite his expressed concern about the Dulles presentation in Washington. In conclusion, I would only raise two critical points regarding Greenberg's theology. The first is his insistence that the path to a more constructive Christian-Jewish theology lies in the abandonment of the Christian proclamation as God Incarnate. I would actually argue the contrary, though I recognize that Incarnationalism requires some redefinition. In my judgment, a view shared by other Christian theologians in the dialogue, Incarnationalism provides a more productive path for a new Christian theology of Judaism than the classical Death/Resurrection theology. And secondly, Greenberg will need to find a way of relating better his theology of the Christian-Jewish relationship to the wider dialogue of religions, particularly Islam. John T. Pawlikowski Catholic Theological Union Chicago Paul and the Jews, by A. Andrew Das. Library of Pauline Studies. Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson, 2003. 238 pp. $24.95. This is

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

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