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Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel by Roman Katsman (review)

Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel by Roman Katsman... | 149 at research emerging from and based on sources depicting the Holocaust east of the Molotov line. This should be considered the next, natural step in the development of this field. Katarzyna Person Jewish Historical Institute, Warsaw, Poland Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel By Roman Katsman. Brighton: MA: Academic Studies Press, 2016. 310 pp. The two waves of immigration from the Former Soviet Union, in the 1970s and 1990s, created one of the largest ethnic groups ever to arrive in the state of Israel. Following this immigration, Jews from the former USSR constituted 12% of the entire population of Israel; though it is a highly heterogeneous group, its members were soon crystallized into a distinct category in Israeli society—"the Russians." The tremendous number of Russian speakers introduced the Russian language into every area of life in the country, and fashioned institutional and cultural infrastructure of the existent Russian community in Israel. The Russian-speaking immigrants in Israel refused to throw off their former identity in their efforts to assimilate in the local culture, unlike their ancestors, who left Russia and arrived in the Land of Israel roughly 100 years before. While keeping http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel by Roman Katsman (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

| 149 at research emerging from and based on sources depicting the Holocaust east of the Molotov line. This should be considered the next, natural step in the development of this field. Katarzyna Person Jewish Historical Institute, Warsaw, Poland Nostalgia for a Foreign Land: Studies in Russian-Language Literature in Israel By Roman Katsman. Brighton: MA: Academic Studies Press, 2016. 310 pp. The two waves of immigration from the Former Soviet Union, in the 1970s and 1990s, created one of the largest ethnic groups ever to arrive in the state of Israel. Following this immigration, Jews from the former USSR constituted 12% of the entire population of Israel; though it is a highly heterogeneous group, its members were soon crystallized into a distinct category in Israeli society—"the Russians." The tremendous number of Russian speakers introduced the Russian language into every area of life in the country, and fashioned institutional and cultural infrastructure of the existent Russian community in Israel. The Russian-speaking immigrants in Israel refused to throw off their former identity in their efforts to assimilate in the local culture, unlike their ancestors, who left Russia and arrived in the Land of Israel roughly 100 years before. While keeping

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Sep 18, 2017

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