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New Jews: The End of the Jewish Diaspora (review)

New Jews: The End of the Jewish Diaspora (review) made. The interrelation of re'ut and nationalism is made explicit in commemoration of the dead, through discourse on shared pasts and shared destinies (as he illustrates with the memorial rites for Prime Minister Rabin). Kaplan's chapters on commemoration, desire, and national solidarity are dense and complex, yet provide a unique contribution to research on men's friendships. Despite the suggestion of the title, Kaplan's book is neither about gay men's friendships and sexual relationships, nor a reinforcement of the clichéd research that men are not capable of intimate friendship. The quoted words of the interviewed men are powerful narratives that forcefully illustrate the interrelationship between the power of culture, history, and national identity and the way men enact their interpersonal relationships. We can feel the emotions in the Israeli men's words and see for ourselves that men "do friendship" in a variety of complex ways that incorporate dominant masculinity, homosocial desire, and national identity. This is a short but compact book that may not be an easy read for many, given its theoretically rich and academically intricate jargon. But it is a book that contributes new insights and ways of thinking about men's friendships and how the personal and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

New Jews: The End of the Jewish Diaspora (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

made. The interrelation of re'ut and nationalism is made explicit in commemoration of the dead, through discourse on shared pasts and shared destinies (as he illustrates with the memorial rites for Prime Minister Rabin). Kaplan's chapters on commemoration, desire, and national solidarity are dense and complex, yet provide a unique contribution to research on men's friendships. Despite the suggestion of the title, Kaplan's book is neither about gay men's friendships and sexual relationships, nor a reinforcement of the clichéd research that men are not capable of intimate friendship. The quoted words of the interviewed men are powerful narratives that forcefully illustrate the interrelationship between the power of culture, history, and national identity and the way men enact their interpersonal relationships. We can feel the emotions in the Israeli men's words and see for ourselves that men "do friendship" in a variety of complex ways that incorporate dominant masculinity, homosocial desire, and national identity. This is a short but compact book that may not be an easy read for many, given its theoretically rich and academically intricate jargon. But it is a book that contributes new insights and ways of thinking about men's friendships and how the personal and

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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