Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic (review)

Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic (review) SHOFAR Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic, by Peter J. Haas. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1987. 256 pp. $21.95. How could such an educationally and culturally advanced society like 20th-century Germany conceive of and implement something as morally repugnant as the Holocaust? This is certainly not a new question, but Peter Haas-a professor of Religious Studies at Vanderbilt University-seeks to approach it from an original angle. Morality After Auschwitz is not so much a book dealing with how people live with themselves after taking part in such a tragedy, but rather it explores, and seeks to comprehend, the motives for German atrocities. The central question for Haas is what kind of morality or ethics were the Germans following that enabled them to commit such heinous acts. Did they not know that what they were doing was morally wrong? The perpetrators knew what was going on, found it ethically tolerable, and consciously acted according, Haas contends. He challenges the philosopher Hannah Arendt's famous description of the Holocaust as the "banality of eviL" The Nazis were anything but banal, argues Haas, as they forthrightly approved of Nazi ideology and carried their task out with enthusiasm. Germans were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/morality-after-auschwitz-the-radical-challenge-of-the-nazi-ethic-nWBFeyfCd0
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SHOFAR Morality After Auschwitz: The Radical Challenge of the Nazi Ethic, by Peter J. Haas. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1987. 256 pp. $21.95. How could such an educationally and culturally advanced society like 20th-century Germany conceive of and implement something as morally repugnant as the Holocaust? This is certainly not a new question, but Peter Haas-a professor of Religious Studies at Vanderbilt University-seeks to approach it from an original angle. Morality After Auschwitz is not so much a book dealing with how people live with themselves after taking part in such a tragedy, but rather it explores, and seeks to comprehend, the motives for German atrocities. The central question for Haas is what kind of morality or ethics were the Germans following that enabled them to commit such heinous acts. Did they not know that what they were doing was morally wrong? The perpetrators knew what was going on, found it ethically tolerable, and consciously acted according, Haas contends. He challenges the philosopher Hannah Arendt's famous description of the Holocaust as the "banality of eviL" The Nazis were anything but banal, argues Haas, as they forthrightly approved of Nazi ideology and carried their task out with enthusiasm. Germans were

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1990

There are no references for this article.