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Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy (review)

Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy (review) Book Reviews 275). Referring to scholars such as Jack Jacobs and Shlomo Avineri (among the few Penslar seems to have missed) would have clarified the "socialist" side. In my own work I have a different interpretation of the "Brandeis/Weizmann" conflict, concerning the inception of the Keren Hayesod as a central Zionist financial instrument; on that I imagine we will agree to disagree. But none of these concerns, in themselves or combined, detracts from the colossal contribution to Jewish history this book represents. As opposed to the common bifurcation between Zionism and everything else, Penslar's book is in league with Jonathan Frankel's monumental Prophesy and Politics for incorporating Zionism within a larger context. There are few works that combine a synthesis of the vast corpus of important scholarship of an unwieldy subject with original archival work, as well as thoughtful readings of long runs of periodicals and other published sources. It will be savored by those who read it, and it will provide more enlightenment about Jewish history in general than almost any other single volume in all of modern Jewish scholarship. Michael Berkowitz University College London Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy, by Jan Feldman. Ithaca: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 275). Referring to scholars such as Jack Jacobs and Shlomo Avineri (among the few Penslar seems to have missed) would have clarified the "socialist" side. In my own work I have a different interpretation of the "Brandeis/Weizmann" conflict, concerning the inception of the Keren Hayesod as a central Zionist financial instrument; on that I imagine we will agree to disagree. But none of these concerns, in themselves or combined, detracts from the colossal contribution to Jewish history this book represents. As opposed to the common bifurcation between Zionism and everything else, Penslar's book is in league with Jonathan Frankel's monumental Prophesy and Politics for incorporating Zionism within a larger context. There are few works that combine a synthesis of the vast corpus of important scholarship of an unwieldy subject with original archival work, as well as thoughtful readings of long runs of periodicals and other published sources. It will be savored by those who read it, and it will provide more enlightenment about Jewish history in general than almost any other single volume in all of modern Jewish scholarship. Michael Berkowitz University College London Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy, by Jan Feldman. Ithaca:

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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