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John F. Kennedy and the Politics of Arms Sales to Israel (review)

John F. Kennedy and the Politics of Arms Sales to Israel (review) SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 John F. Kennedy and the Politics of Arms Sales to Israel, by Abraham Ben-Zvi. London: Frank Cass, 2002. 140 pp. $24.50. In an era in which the United States is Israel's closest friend, ally, and military supplier, it is often hard to remember a time when that was not the case. But before 1967 Israel depended on arms from various European countries. Relations with the United States were good, but sometimes quite tense, such as during and after the Suez crisis in 1956 and 1957. During the challenging 1948­1967 period, the U.S. was extremely reluctant to make arms available to Israel. Since the Israeli government, and particularly Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, understood well (and presciently) that European suppliers might not prove dependable in the long run, efforts were made to develop sources in the American market. These efforts were stymied at first by various foreign policy considerations and the strong opposition of key elements in the U.S. security and foreign affairs establishment. Although President Dwight D. Eisenhower began to appreciate Israel's strategic significance during his second term, it was only with the advent of the presidency of John F. Kennedy that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

John F. Kennedy and the Politics of Arms Sales to Israel (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 John F. Kennedy and the Politics of Arms Sales to Israel, by Abraham Ben-Zvi. London: Frank Cass, 2002. 140 pp. $24.50. In an era in which the United States is Israel's closest friend, ally, and military supplier, it is often hard to remember a time when that was not the case. But before 1967 Israel depended on arms from various European countries. Relations with the United States were good, but sometimes quite tense, such as during and after the Suez crisis in 1956 and 1957. During the challenging 1948­1967 period, the U.S. was extremely reluctant to make arms available to Israel. Since the Israeli government, and particularly Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, understood well (and presciently) that European suppliers might not prove dependable in the long run, efforts were made to develop sources in the American market. These efforts were stymied at first by various foreign policy considerations and the strong opposition of key elements in the U.S. security and foreign affairs establishment. Although President Dwight D. Eisenhower began to appreciate Israel's strategic significance during his second term, it was only with the advent of the presidency of John F. Kennedy that

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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