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Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth (review)

Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth (review) contacts between the two religious communities that might have exposed Jews to Christian practices or motivated them to imitate their Christian neighbors. Moreover, Baader ends this nuanced and complex text with some sweeping conclusions: "In the new rites of modern Jewish religious culture, women were men's equals" (p. 217). But, as Baader explains in earlier chapters, the Jewish law that governed gender relations in and outside the synagogue was never changed, and continued to reinforce male supremacy. As women were not ordained as rabbis, men continued to lead worship services and exercise authority over community life. Baader is right to emphasize the positive significance of nineteenth-century domestic ideology. But women's position in the family was still subordinate. No more than their Christian counterparts could Jewish wives and mothers exercise authority over children, family finances, and most other aspects of family life, which husbands still legally controlled. In the nineteenth century, German Jewish women may have gained in dignity and influence, but gender equality was still a distant goal. Ann Taylor Allen University of Louisville Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth, by Susannah Ticciati. London/New York: T&T Clark, 2005. 204 pp. $79.95. This book displays the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

contacts between the two religious communities that might have exposed Jews to Christian practices or motivated them to imitate their Christian neighbors. Moreover, Baader ends this nuanced and complex text with some sweeping conclusions: "In the new rites of modern Jewish religious culture, women were men's equals" (p. 217). But, as Baader explains in earlier chapters, the Jewish law that governed gender relations in and outside the synagogue was never changed, and continued to reinforce male supremacy. As women were not ordained as rabbis, men continued to lead worship services and exercise authority over community life. Baader is right to emphasize the positive significance of nineteenth-century domestic ideology. But women's position in the family was still subordinate. No more than their Christian counterparts could Jewish wives and mothers exercise authority over children, family finances, and most other aspects of family life, which husbands still legally controlled. In the nineteenth century, German Jewish women may have gained in dignity and influence, but gender equality was still a distant goal. Ann Taylor Allen University of Louisville Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth, by Susannah Ticciati. London/New York: T&T Clark, 2005. 204 pp. $79.95. This book displays the

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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