Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora from Alexander to Hadrian (323 B.C.E.-117 C.E. (review)

Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora from Alexander to Hadrian (323 B.C.E.-117 C.E. (review) SHOFAR Spring 2000 Vol. 18, No.3 century, good citizenship became more and more closely identified with correct beliefa situation that had not existed earlier. Partly in order to establish their own identity, Christian leaders began to distinguish their "Hebrew" spiritual ancestors from currentday Jews. Now accused of being murderers, Jews faced a revival of the earlier literary ridicule of their laws and customs. Moreover, the autonomy of the large cities disappeared, so that Christian emperors began to intervene directly when conflicts between Jewish and gentile inhabitants arose. Jews became increasingly 'an alien presence, legally tolerated but restricted in numerous ways. The main value of this remarkable book lies in its utility as a reference. Most of its main lines of analysis and conclusions--eoncerning Jewish-Roman relations, the acta pro Iudaies, growing anti-Judaism in the Church fathers, and the anti-Jewish programs of a Christian Rome, even the suggestive parallels with Nazism-are already familiar enough in broad outline, though in isolated studies. Nor is Noethlichs' featured methodological counterbalance to the admittedly more commonjudeo-centric bias (by looking at matters from the Roman side), laudable though it is, all that rare: one thinks of the many classicists, especially in the U.K. (Fergus Millar, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora from Alexander to Hadrian (323 B.C.E.-117 C.E. (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/jews-in-the-mediterranean-diaspora-from-alexander-to-hadrian-323-b-c-e-2EAGUkgC0n
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SHOFAR Spring 2000 Vol. 18, No.3 century, good citizenship became more and more closely identified with correct beliefa situation that had not existed earlier. Partly in order to establish their own identity, Christian leaders began to distinguish their "Hebrew" spiritual ancestors from currentday Jews. Now accused of being murderers, Jews faced a revival of the earlier literary ridicule of their laws and customs. Moreover, the autonomy of the large cities disappeared, so that Christian emperors began to intervene directly when conflicts between Jewish and gentile inhabitants arose. Jews became increasingly 'an alien presence, legally tolerated but restricted in numerous ways. The main value of this remarkable book lies in its utility as a reference. Most of its main lines of analysis and conclusions--eoncerning Jewish-Roman relations, the acta pro Iudaies, growing anti-Judaism in the Church fathers, and the anti-Jewish programs of a Christian Rome, even the suggestive parallels with Nazism-are already familiar enough in broad outline, though in isolated studies. Nor is Noethlichs' featured methodological counterbalance to the admittedly more commonjudeo-centric bias (by looking at matters from the Roman side), laudable though it is, all that rare: one thinks of the many classicists, especially in the U.K. (Fergus Millar,

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 2000

There are no references for this article.