Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Human Rights and Groups: Beyond the Particular/Universal Dichotomy

Human Rights and Groups: Beyond the Particular/Universal Dichotomy Human Rights and Groups: Beyond the Particular/Universal Dichotomy Leora Bilsky James Loefe fl r’s new book entitled Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century suggests that our contemporary understand- ing of international human rights as fundamentally opposed to national politics is based on the false dichotomies between particularism and universalism and between politics and law. By turning our attention to the history of the human-rights e fi ld—and particularly to the strug - gles of five Jewish founding fathers of international human rights—we find that from their perspectives, human rights were actually closely related to national-group politics; that specic fi ally Zionism, as a national movement, was not contrary to international law or human-rights law or human-rights law but was rather a catalyst for legal creativity; and that human-rights law was not created out of indifference or hostility toward group politics but was rather integrated into attempts to protect and provide political maneuvering space for the group. In fact, the struggle for collective group recognition and protection was at the heart of the legal tools and institutions that they proposed, including the Genocide Convention, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the recogni- tion of crimes against http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Human Rights and Groups: Beyond the Particular/Universal Dichotomy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/human-rights-and-groups-beyond-the-particular-universal-dichotomy-JThy2uZ74m
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165

Abstract

Human Rights and Groups: Beyond the Particular/Universal Dichotomy Leora Bilsky James Loefe fl r’s new book entitled Rooted Cosmopolitans: Jews and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century suggests that our contemporary understand- ing of international human rights as fundamentally opposed to national politics is based on the false dichotomies between particularism and universalism and between politics and law. By turning our attention to the history of the human-rights e fi ld—and particularly to the strug - gles of five Jewish founding fathers of international human rights—we find that from their perspectives, human rights were actually closely related to national-group politics; that specic fi ally Zionism, as a national movement, was not contrary to international law or human-rights law or human-rights law but was rather a catalyst for legal creativity; and that human-rights law was not created out of indifference or hostility toward group politics but was rather integrated into attempts to protect and provide political maneuvering space for the group. In fact, the struggle for collective group recognition and protection was at the heart of the legal tools and institutions that they proposed, including the Genocide Convention, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the recogni- tion of crimes against

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Mar 15, 2019

There are no references for this article.