Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

History on Trial: My Day in Court with David Irving (review)

History on Trial: My Day in Court with David Irving (review) Less uplifting is Daniel Blatman's subsequent chapter, "The Reaction of Jewish Functionaries and Organizations." It is a rather depressing study of Jewish "bystanders," who recognized the impending catastrophe in Europe but stood by helplessly as neither Jewish agencies nor allied governments understood, or were moved into action, by the gravity of the situation. Singling out Gerhard Riegner, Ignacy Schwarzbart, and Szmuel Zygielbojm, representing the World Jewish Congress, the Representation of Polish Jews, and the Bund and Jewish labor organizations in the United States, respectively, Blatman examines how these functionaries and organizations judged the information of genocide received from German sources and the Polish underground and to what extent they were prepared to act on it. By the end of 1942, when Jewish functionaries were still discussing what transpired in Nazi-occupied Europe and the epicenter of the Holocaust, Poland, Aktion Reinhard had already peaked and--as conveyed by Stephen Tyas' citations of SS radio transmissions from Lublin to Berlin--claimed the lives of 1,276,166 victims in death camps of this operation alone (pp. 440­441). Nearly another 300,000 died by the end of Aktion Reinhard, bringing the total to approximately 1.5 million (Pohl, p. 27). To this fairly accurate number must be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

History on Trial: My Day in Court with David Irving (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/history-on-trial-my-day-in-court-with-david-irving-review-mZIrmM0VIC
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Less uplifting is Daniel Blatman's subsequent chapter, "The Reaction of Jewish Functionaries and Organizations." It is a rather depressing study of Jewish "bystanders," who recognized the impending catastrophe in Europe but stood by helplessly as neither Jewish agencies nor allied governments understood, or were moved into action, by the gravity of the situation. Singling out Gerhard Riegner, Ignacy Schwarzbart, and Szmuel Zygielbojm, representing the World Jewish Congress, the Representation of Polish Jews, and the Bund and Jewish labor organizations in the United States, respectively, Blatman examines how these functionaries and organizations judged the information of genocide received from German sources and the Polish underground and to what extent they were prepared to act on it. By the end of 1942, when Jewish functionaries were still discussing what transpired in Nazi-occupied Europe and the epicenter of the Holocaust, Poland, Aktion Reinhard had already peaked and--as conveyed by Stephen Tyas' citations of SS radio transmissions from Lublin to Berlin--claimed the lives of 1,276,166 victims in death camps of this operation alone (pp. 440­441). Nearly another 300,000 died by the end of Aktion Reinhard, bringing the total to approximately 1.5 million (Pohl, p. 27). To this fairly accurate number must be

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

There are no references for this article.