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Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis (review)

Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis (review) SHOFAR Spring 2000 Vol. 18, NO.3 Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis, by Karen Silvia de Leon-Jones. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997. 273 pp. $37.50. There have been many Giordano Brunos over the centuries: the martyr to the cause of science and liberal thinking, the Magus, the Hermeticist, the homosexual, the spy. Karen Silvia de Leon-Jones presents a somewhat new picture by establishing Bruno's knowledge and utilization of the Kabbalah. Leon-Jones considers her book unique because it is the first to fully bring out the kabbalistic elements in Bruno's thinking. She makes the important point that it is only by considering Bruno's "moral dialogues," Lo spaccio della bestia tronfante [The Expulsion of the Triumphant Beast] (1584), La cabala del cavallo pegaseo [The Kabbalah of the Pegasean Horse] (1585), and De gli eroci furiori [On the Heroic Frenzies] (1585), as a single unit, and not as separate entities, that an appreciation of the kabbalistic content emerges. She clearly shows that Bruno did have considerable knowledge of basic elements ofkabbalistic thought: the concept of Ein sol, the highest and virtually unknowable divine element; the sejirot, the ten emanations of Ein sol, which acted as a link http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis (review)

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Copyright © Purdue University.
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Abstract

SHOFAR Spring 2000 Vol. 18, NO.3 Giordano Bruno and the Kabbalah: Prophets, Magicians, and Rabbis, by Karen Silvia de Leon-Jones. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997. 273 pp. $37.50. There have been many Giordano Brunos over the centuries: the martyr to the cause of science and liberal thinking, the Magus, the Hermeticist, the homosexual, the spy. Karen Silvia de Leon-Jones presents a somewhat new picture by establishing Bruno's knowledge and utilization of the Kabbalah. Leon-Jones considers her book unique because it is the first to fully bring out the kabbalistic elements in Bruno's thinking. She makes the important point that it is only by considering Bruno's "moral dialogues," Lo spaccio della bestia tronfante [The Expulsion of the Triumphant Beast] (1584), La cabala del cavallo pegaseo [The Kabbalah of the Pegasean Horse] (1585), and De gli eroci furiori [On the Heroic Frenzies] (1585), as a single unit, and not as separate entities, that an appreciation of the kabbalistic content emerges. She clearly shows that Bruno did have considerable knowledge of basic elements ofkabbalistic thought: the concept of Ein sol, the highest and virtually unknowable divine element; the sejirot, the ten emanations of Ein sol, which acted as a link

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 2000

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