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Gender, Power, and Promise: The Subject of the Bible's First Story (review)

Gender, Power, and Promise: The Subject of the Bible's First Story (review) Book Reviews the Qumran scrolls. The first fascicle of their computer-generated reconstructions of unpublished Cave 4 material, released in September of 1991, was the initial step in a series of closely connected events that eventually resulted in free access to the scrolls by all interested parties. The suppression of their significance in this story, whether accidental or deliberate, is cavalier and irresponsible. John C. Reeves Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies Winthrop University Gender, Power, and Promise: The Subject of the Bible's First Story, by Danna Nolan Fewell and David M. Gunn. Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 1993. 208 pp. $14.95 (P). This is a terrific book on a terrible topic: the role of gender in the interplay between power relations and divine promise in the Hebrew Bible. The authors ask the question of Genesis-Kings, "Who is the Subject of this text?" Their method is literary, informed by the latest trends in postmodern and feminist criticism without lapsing into jargon or obscurity. They seek to "practice reading in the defiance of the apparent disposition of the text. . . seek[ing] to assign primary subjectivity to the women of the text ... ," an impossible task (p. 2). They find http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Gender, Power, and Promise: The Subject of the Bible's First Story (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

Book Reviews the Qumran scrolls. The first fascicle of their computer-generated reconstructions of unpublished Cave 4 material, released in September of 1991, was the initial step in a series of closely connected events that eventually resulted in free access to the scrolls by all interested parties. The suppression of their significance in this story, whether accidental or deliberate, is cavalier and irresponsible. John C. Reeves Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies Winthrop University Gender, Power, and Promise: The Subject of the Bible's First Story, by Danna Nolan Fewell and David M. Gunn. Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 1993. 208 pp. $14.95 (P). This is a terrific book on a terrible topic: the role of gender in the interplay between power relations and divine promise in the Hebrew Bible. The authors ask the question of Genesis-Kings, "Who is the Subject of this text?" Their method is literary, informed by the latest trends in postmodern and feminist criticism without lapsing into jargon or obscurity. They seek to "practice reading in the defiance of the apparent disposition of the text. . . seek[ing] to assign primary subjectivity to the women of the text ... ," an impossible task (p. 2). They find

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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