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From Ugly Duckling to Cool Fashion Icon: Sarah Jessica Parker's Blonde Ambitions

From Ugly Duckling to Cool Fashion Icon: Sarah Jessica Parker's Blonde Ambitions Sarah Jessica Parker is a cool Jew, or so we argue in this essay. That is, the actress and the role that made her most famous—Sex and the City's iconic Carrie Bradshaw—offer fans a particular kind of pleasure that comes from identifying with an actor and character who are presented as, if not explicitly Jewish, then Jewish to those in the know. We argue, however, that Parker's ascent to superstar status necessitated a shift in the way her physical body has been produced, a shift away from those physical traits that might be read as explicitly or stereotypically Jewish. In this way her career mirrors the deep ambivalence we feel about postmodern identity and its dual promises of privilege: the privilege of uniqueness and the myth that we can all somehow attain the universal. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

From Ugly Duckling to Cool Fashion Icon: Sarah Jessica Parker's Blonde Ambitions

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Purdue University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sarah Jessica Parker is a cool Jew, or so we argue in this essay. That is, the actress and the role that made her most famous—Sex and the City's iconic Carrie Bradshaw—offer fans a particular kind of pleasure that comes from identifying with an actor and character who are presented as, if not explicitly Jewish, then Jewish to those in the know. We argue, however, that Parker's ascent to superstar status necessitated a shift in the way her physical body has been produced, a shift away from those physical traits that might be read as explicitly or stereotypically Jewish. In this way her career mirrors the deep ambivalence we feel about postmodern identity and its dual promises of privilege: the privilege of uniqueness and the myth that we can all somehow attain the universal.

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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