Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah (review)

From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic... From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah, by Shaul Magid. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008. 345 pp. $39.94. Shaul Magid has written a bold and intriguing book that should be stimulating to scholars of Jewish literature and intellectual thought. Utilizing five Scriptural narratives--one from each book of the Chumash--Magid shows how Lurianic Kabbalists imposed their own particular mystical interpretation on Scripture. Reconstructing the Lurianic Kabbalists' exegesis, he argues that their reading of Scripture linked contemporary sociological issues with metaphysical themes. Their most compelling societal issue was a preoccupation with the question of the conversos who wished to re-enter Judaism and the Jewish community. Their metaphysical preoccupation was the presence of Evil in a world that Torah proclaimed, "And God saw all that He had Made, and behold it was very good." Both these themes concerned a concept of "the Other." Each of the Scriptural narratives that Magid presents is a case study of the Other. In Genesis, Magid presents the Lurianic interpretation of Adam's sin as a way to introduce their view of Evil; in Exodus, he examines the Lurianic exegesis of the erev rav, the minority of non-Jews http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/purdue-university-press/from-metaphysics-to-midrash-myth-history-and-the-interpretation-of-aDtOEix8m1
Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University Press
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbalah, by Shaul Magid. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008. 345 pp. $39.94. Shaul Magid has written a bold and intriguing book that should be stimulating to scholars of Jewish literature and intellectual thought. Utilizing five Scriptural narratives--one from each book of the Chumash--Magid shows how Lurianic Kabbalists imposed their own particular mystical interpretation on Scripture. Reconstructing the Lurianic Kabbalists' exegesis, he argues that their reading of Scripture linked contemporary sociological issues with metaphysical themes. Their most compelling societal issue was a preoccupation with the question of the conversos who wished to re-enter Judaism and the Jewish community. Their metaphysical preoccupation was the presence of Evil in a world that Torah proclaimed, "And God saw all that He had Made, and behold it was very good." Both these themes concerned a concept of "the Other." Each of the Scriptural narratives that Magid presents is a case study of the Other. In Genesis, Magid presents the Lurianic interpretation of Adam's sin as a way to introduce their view of Evil; in Exodus, he examines the Lurianic exegesis of the erev rav, the minority of non-Jews

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jun 24, 2009

There are no references for this article.