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From Immigrant to Ethnic Culture: American Yiddish in South Philadelphia (review)

From Immigrant to Ethnic Culture: American Yiddish in South Philadelphia (review) Book Reviews ... ,f, ·· on "maternalism" -in the shaping of immigrant women's experience is well placed. I did wish, however, that the book included more primarily historical documentation, more case material, and more "women's voices." The photographs, including several of the same Italian wife who remained in Italy while her husband migrated and she bore his children (conceived, one imagines, on his return journeys), are striking in what they seem to say about individual women's lives. I wanted more of these kinds of materials in the texts-either from diaries, letters, or government reports. I would have liked more first-hand quotations from social workers' reports that would give us the flavor and content of the kinds of "maternalism" displayed towards Italian and Jewish women. Rather than repeating her overview in the conclusion, I would have preferred more pages throughout the book devoted to descriptions ofwomen's lives, contrasts between working daughters and stay-at-home mothers, and comparisons between the discourses used by German Jewish reformers and their Anglo-American counterparts. FriedmanKasaba's perspective, however, can help us re-read some of the already published novels, personal narratives, and historical analyses that touch on the lives of these turnof-the century Italian and Jewish women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

From Immigrant to Ethnic Culture: American Yiddish in South Philadelphia (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

Book Reviews ... ,f, ·· on "maternalism" -in the shaping of immigrant women's experience is well placed. I did wish, however, that the book included more primarily historical documentation, more case material, and more "women's voices." The photographs, including several of the same Italian wife who remained in Italy while her husband migrated and she bore his children (conceived, one imagines, on his return journeys), are striking in what they seem to say about individual women's lives. I wanted more of these kinds of materials in the texts-either from diaries, letters, or government reports. I would have liked more first-hand quotations from social workers' reports that would give us the flavor and content of the kinds of "maternalism" displayed towards Italian and Jewish women. Rather than repeating her overview in the conclusion, I would have preferred more pages throughout the book devoted to descriptions ofwomen's lives, contrasts between working daughters and stay-at-home mothers, and comparisons between the discourses used by German Jewish reformers and their Anglo-American counterparts. FriedmanKasaba's perspective, however, can help us re-read some of the already published novels, personal narratives, and historical analyses that touch on the lives of these turnof-the century Italian and Jewish women.

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1999

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