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Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment of Americans in Hitler's Camps (review)

Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment of Americans in Hitler's Camps (review) SHOFAR Winter 1996 Vol. 14, No.2 grew dissatisfied with Wise's diplomacy and Roosevelt's lack of commitment. More than just documenting the evolution of American Zionism, Shpiro's book reveals important insights into American social history. His work illustrates how Jews helped expand the limits of acceptable ethnicgroup expression in American society. In the prewar period, assimilation reigned. Zionism loomed as a threat to the Jews' status as loyal and patriotic Americans. When Hitler emerged as the common enemy of both Americans and Jews, though, Zionists enjoyed greater political latitude. They could, as Silver demonstrated, employ patriotic language to advocate the creation of a Jewish state. Shpiro has done a masterful job researching this book. Using organizational records, government documents, personal papers, and oral histories from both the United States and Israel, Shpiro paints a finely textured portrait of American Zionism and brings his readers into the everyday lives and struggles of his subjects. Shpiro's study, the fourth in a Holocaust series published by Pergamon Press, is an important and needed contribution to both Jewish and United States history. Marc Dollinger Department of History Bryn Mawr College Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment ofAmericans in Hitler's Camps, by Mitchell G. Bard. Boulder, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment of Americans in Hitler's Camps (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 1996 Vol. 14, No.2 grew dissatisfied with Wise's diplomacy and Roosevelt's lack of commitment. More than just documenting the evolution of American Zionism, Shpiro's book reveals important insights into American social history. His work illustrates how Jews helped expand the limits of acceptable ethnicgroup expression in American society. In the prewar period, assimilation reigned. Zionism loomed as a threat to the Jews' status as loyal and patriotic Americans. When Hitler emerged as the common enemy of both Americans and Jews, though, Zionists enjoyed greater political latitude. They could, as Silver demonstrated, employ patriotic language to advocate the creation of a Jewish state. Shpiro has done a masterful job researching this book. Using organizational records, government documents, personal papers, and oral histories from both the United States and Israel, Shpiro paints a finely textured portrait of American Zionism and brings his readers into the everyday lives and struggles of his subjects. Shpiro's study, the fourth in a Holocaust series published by Pergamon Press, is an important and needed contribution to both Jewish and United States history. Marc Dollinger Department of History Bryn Mawr College Forgotten Victims: The Abandonment ofAmericans in Hitler's Camps, by Mitchell G. Bard. Boulder,

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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