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Experience and Expression: Women, the Nazis, and the Holocaust (review)

Experience and Expression: Women, the Nazis, and the Holocaust (review) SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 account of an "insider as outsider," Bartov believes that Klemperer recorded, as no other Jew was able to do, the extreme complexity of the German Jewish plight, of the Jew who could not divest himself of his love of the "other Germany," who asserted bitterly and repeatedly that he was the only real German at the end of the Third Reich. The only dissonance Bartov injects is his exasperation at Klemperer's persistent opposition to Zionism, noting acerbically that Klemperer's constant refrain about being the last German should have really been "almost the last Jew in Germany." This most valuable study ends with what this reviewer feels is a somewhat undigested chapter on postwar German intellectuals who, preoccupied with German victimhood, have been unable to empathize with the Jews. Already introduced briefly earlier in the book, rather generally Bartov singles out for criticism the works of Heinrich Böll, Siegfried Lenz, Günter Grass, and numerous postwar filmmakers, one of whom, Rainer-Werner Fassbinder, even produced visual portrayals of the Jews with decidedly antisemitic undertones. Since this German non-recognition of the victim is an underlying theme pervading Bartov's book, these last few pages could well http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Experience and Expression: Women, the Nazis, and the Holocaust (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 2005 Vol. 23, No. 2 account of an "insider as outsider," Bartov believes that Klemperer recorded, as no other Jew was able to do, the extreme complexity of the German Jewish plight, of the Jew who could not divest himself of his love of the "other Germany," who asserted bitterly and repeatedly that he was the only real German at the end of the Third Reich. The only dissonance Bartov injects is his exasperation at Klemperer's persistent opposition to Zionism, noting acerbically that Klemperer's constant refrain about being the last German should have really been "almost the last Jew in Germany." This most valuable study ends with what this reviewer feels is a somewhat undigested chapter on postwar German intellectuals who, preoccupied with German victimhood, have been unable to empathize with the Jews. Already introduced briefly earlier in the book, rather generally Bartov singles out for criticism the works of Heinrich Böll, Siegfried Lenz, Günter Grass, and numerous postwar filmmakers, one of whom, Rainer-Werner Fassbinder, even produced visual portrayals of the Jews with decidedly antisemitic undertones. Since this German non-recognition of the victim is an underlying theme pervading Bartov's book, these last few pages could well

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 24, 2005

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