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Crises of Memory and the Second World War (review)

Crises of Memory and the Second World War (review) Despite these reservations, Why Arendt Matters lives up to Young-Bruehl's intention, conveying Arendt's major themes with the enthusiasm and generosity--if sometimes also the one-sidedness--of a teacher who wants to shape and protect a student's initial encounter with an important subject. Though another introduction may not be desperately needed, this one offers valuable lessons on how to think with and beyond Hannah Arendt. Cara O'Connor Department of Philosophy Stony Brook University Crises of Memory and the Second World War, by Susan Suleiman. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006. 286 pp. $29.95. Remembering, its personal, cultural, and political functions, has been for some time a major concern of cultural theorists such as Maurice Halbwachs, Paul Ricoeur, Jan and Aleida Assmann, and Pierre Nora. Building on their studies, Susan Suleiman carefully and subtly analyzes in her new book a number of concrete cases that exemplify, in various ways, crises of memory. Such crises are, for her, "a moment of choice, and sometimes of predicament or conflict, about remembrance of the past. . . . At issue in a crisis of memory is the question of self-representation." In the crises of memory that she examines, "individual self-representation overlaps with--and sometimes becomes the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Crises of Memory and the Second World War (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite these reservations, Why Arendt Matters lives up to Young-Bruehl's intention, conveying Arendt's major themes with the enthusiasm and generosity--if sometimes also the one-sidedness--of a teacher who wants to shape and protect a student's initial encounter with an important subject. Though another introduction may not be desperately needed, this one offers valuable lessons on how to think with and beyond Hannah Arendt. Cara O'Connor Department of Philosophy Stony Brook University Crises of Memory and the Second World War, by Susan Suleiman. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006. 286 pp. $29.95. Remembering, its personal, cultural, and political functions, has been for some time a major concern of cultural theorists such as Maurice Halbwachs, Paul Ricoeur, Jan and Aleida Assmann, and Pierre Nora. Building on their studies, Susan Suleiman carefully and subtly analyzes in her new book a number of concrete cases that exemplify, in various ways, crises of memory. Such crises are, for her, "a moment of choice, and sometimes of predicament or conflict, about remembrance of the past. . . . At issue in a crisis of memory is the question of self-representation." In the crises of memory that she examines, "individual self-representation overlaps with--and sometimes becomes the

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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