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Criminal Case 40/61: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, an Eyewitness Account (review)

Criminal Case 40/61: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, an Eyewitness Account (review) ror in the 20th century. This request will probably be intentionally misread as a call for relativization. Yet Barnouw is not interested in relativizing the Holocaust. She wants the world to recognize that Germans experienced loss on a grand scale. This recognition of massive death, loss, and destruction is not meant to level some kind of historical balance sheet but to bring back German experiences into the focus of that time. Since the discovery of the enormity of the Holocaust, German experiences of suffering had been disqualified from being admissible in the court of world history. Germans became defined as people without genuine human experiences. Like Grass, Sebald, and Friedrich, Barnouw refuses to accept this distortion of history. Manfred Henningsen Department of Political Science University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu Criminal Case 40/61: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, an Eyewitness Account, by Harry Mulisch. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. 178 pp. $27.50. Harry Mulisch's book was first published in the Netherlands, his homeland, more than 45 years ago in proximity to the end of the judicial process. However, only now has it been made available to interested English readers. The book could be considered yet one more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

Criminal Case 40/61: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, an Eyewitness Account (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Purdue University
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

ror in the 20th century. This request will probably be intentionally misread as a call for relativization. Yet Barnouw is not interested in relativizing the Holocaust. She wants the world to recognize that Germans experienced loss on a grand scale. This recognition of massive death, loss, and destruction is not meant to level some kind of historical balance sheet but to bring back German experiences into the focus of that time. Since the discovery of the enormity of the Holocaust, German experiences of suffering had been disqualified from being admissible in the court of world history. Germans became defined as people without genuine human experiences. Like Grass, Sebald, and Friedrich, Barnouw refuses to accept this distortion of history. Manfred Henningsen Department of Political Science University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu Criminal Case 40/61: The Trial of Adolf Eichmann, an Eyewitness Account, by Harry Mulisch. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. 178 pp. $27.50. Harry Mulisch's book was first published in the Netherlands, his homeland, more than 45 years ago in proximity to the end of the judicial process. However, only now has it been made available to interested English readers. The book could be considered yet one more

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Feb 13, 2009

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