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Children Writing the Holocaust (review)

Children Writing the Holocaust (review) accounts of terrorism (including the Gothic fiction of terror) and conspiracy theories during and after the French Revolution expressed antisemitic motifs (chapter 4) and of how a rekindled antisemitism in the fin-de-siècle informs Dracula, Trilby, H. Rider Haggard's She, Oscar Wilde's Portrait of Dorian Gray, Marie Corelli's The Sorrows of Satan, and theories about the identity and motives of Jack ("Jacob"?) the Ripper (chapter 5). Anti-Semitism and British Gothic Literature is a worthy addition to the growing list of studies of British responses to Jews and Judaism. It demonstrates quite effectively that antisemitism has played a central role in British culture from the eighteenth well into the twentieth century. The last work of British fiction Davison deals with, before turning to Germany and Nazism, is Charles Williams's 1948 All Hallow's Eve, although one imagines that there are many more recent instances. Davison's study shows how the figure of the vampire is related to medieval antisemitic accounts of "the Blood Libel," so wherever vampires appear in fiction or film, and no matter what their race or nationality appears to be (Transylvanian or otherwise), there is a good chance that antisemitism is at least lurking in the unconscious wings. Patrick http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

accounts of terrorism (including the Gothic fiction of terror) and conspiracy theories during and after the French Revolution expressed antisemitic motifs (chapter 4) and of how a rekindled antisemitism in the fin-de-siècle informs Dracula, Trilby, H. Rider Haggard's She, Oscar Wilde's Portrait of Dorian Gray, Marie Corelli's The Sorrows of Satan, and theories about the identity and motives of Jack ("Jacob"?) the Ripper (chapter 5). Anti-Semitism and British Gothic Literature is a worthy addition to the growing list of studies of British responses to Jews and Judaism. It demonstrates quite effectively that antisemitism has played a central role in British culture from the eighteenth well into the twentieth century. The last work of British fiction Davison deals with, before turning to Germany and Nazism, is Charles Williams's 1948 All Hallow's Eve, although one imagines that there are many more recent instances. Davison's study shows how the figure of the vampire is related to medieval antisemitic accounts of "the Blood Libel," so wherever vampires appear in fiction or film, and no matter what their race or nationality appears to be (Transylvanian or otherwise), there is a good chance that antisemitism is at least lurking in the unconscious wings. Patrick

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2006

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