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But She Said (review)

But She Said (review) Book Reviews so prevalent of that period. Now that neurophysiologic explanations of mental disorders are back in vogue, psychoanalysis has become less preeminent and is on the wane as a significant treatment tool. Nonetheless, its ideas and terminology have been taken over by Western culture to a degree where their beginnings have become obscured. It is to the credit of authors such as Diller for drawing our attention to the enigma of creativity in terms of both individual development and cultural determinism. Freud'sJewish Identity is an insightful work which is well referenced. The writing is somewhat marred by spelling and typographical errors but is quite readable in all other respects. Both mental health professionals and lay readership, as well as students of Jewish identity issues, may find this volume enlightening. Werner I. Halpern, M.D. Rochester, New York But She Said, by Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza. Boston: Beacon Press, 1992. 261 pp. $24.00. Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza's recent book, But She Said, is both an extension of her earlier work and an attempt to develop feminist biblical interpretation in new directions. In In Memory ofHer (Crossroads, 1983), Schussler Fiorenza attended to the feminist reconstruction of Christian origins, arguing for the centrality http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews so prevalent of that period. Now that neurophysiologic explanations of mental disorders are back in vogue, psychoanalysis has become less preeminent and is on the wane as a significant treatment tool. Nonetheless, its ideas and terminology have been taken over by Western culture to a degree where their beginnings have become obscured. It is to the credit of authors such as Diller for drawing our attention to the enigma of creativity in terms of both individual development and cultural determinism. Freud'sJewish Identity is an insightful work which is well referenced. The writing is somewhat marred by spelling and typographical errors but is quite readable in all other respects. Both mental health professionals and lay readership, as well as students of Jewish identity issues, may find this volume enlightening. Werner I. Halpern, M.D. Rochester, New York But She Said, by Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza. Boston: Beacon Press, 1992. 261 pp. $24.00. Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza's recent book, But She Said, is both an extension of her earlier work and an attempt to develop feminist biblical interpretation in new directions. In In Memory ofHer (Crossroads, 1983), Schussler Fiorenza attended to the feminist reconstruction of Christian origins, arguing for the centrality

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1994

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