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America's Fair Share: The Admission and Resettlement of Displaced Persons (review)

America's Fair Share: The Admission and Resettlement of Displaced Persons (review) SHOFAR Winter 1996 Vol. 14, No.2 rate at which Jews appear in a locality may do more to inspire antisemitism than does their ultimate percentage of the population; and Charleston Jewry's sociocultural character did not change appreciably at the time. Between 1830 and 1860, however, the rate of Jewish population growth in the United States outdistanced the national rate by some 1300 percent, Jews spread far outside the few eastern, urban enclaves they had traditionally inhabited, and recent immigrants altered community profiles, all of which madejews more conspicuous, but to what affect Jaher does not say. Moreover, even if one accepts his argument about Christianity's paramount role in generating antisemitism, Jaher cannot explain the panicular incidence of bias because he treats Christian faith and activity as constants. Levels of congregational membership, spiritual styles, interest in proselytizing, and evangelical methods have always fluctuated, affecting how churches dealt with each other, let alone religious outsiders. Not all Americans ever imagined they lived in a Christian nation-indeed, ministers habitually bemoaned the existence of people who had hardly even heard of Christ-and those who did varied their behavior towards Jews. If pious animosity begets intolerance, then explanations for American antisemitism must take http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies Purdue University Press

America's Fair Share: The Admission and Resettlement of Displaced Persons (review)

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Purdue University.
ISSN
1534-5165
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Abstract

SHOFAR Winter 1996 Vol. 14, No.2 rate at which Jews appear in a locality may do more to inspire antisemitism than does their ultimate percentage of the population; and Charleston Jewry's sociocultural character did not change appreciably at the time. Between 1830 and 1860, however, the rate of Jewish population growth in the United States outdistanced the national rate by some 1300 percent, Jews spread far outside the few eastern, urban enclaves they had traditionally inhabited, and recent immigrants altered community profiles, all of which madejews more conspicuous, but to what affect Jaher does not say. Moreover, even if one accepts his argument about Christianity's paramount role in generating antisemitism, Jaher cannot explain the panicular incidence of bias because he treats Christian faith and activity as constants. Levels of congregational membership, spiritual styles, interest in proselytizing, and evangelical methods have always fluctuated, affecting how churches dealt with each other, let alone religious outsiders. Not all Americans ever imagined they lived in a Christian nation-indeed, ministers habitually bemoaned the existence of people who had hardly even heard of Christ-and those who did varied their behavior towards Jews. If pious animosity begets intolerance, then explanations for American antisemitism must take

Journal

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish StudiesPurdue University Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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