A "Scientific Aesthetic Method": John Dewey, Albert Barnes and the Question of Aesthetic Formalism

A "Scientific Aesthetic Method": John Dewey, Albert Barnes and the Question of Aesthetic Formalism This symposium provides five case studies of the ways that John Dewey's philosophy and practice were influenced by women or "weirdoes" (our choices include F. M. Alexander, Albert Barnes, Helen Bradford Thompson, Elsie Ripley Clapp, and Jane Addams) and presents some conclusions about the value of dialoging across difference for philosophers and other scholars. Introduction In The Education of John Dewey, Jay Martin (2003) suggests, "It was and remained a characteristic of Dewey that he was always receptive to alternative ideas. With professional philosophers, he generally held to his own positions, but with intelligent women, non-philosophers, odd thinkers, and ordinary folk, he was a student again" (167). Martin's insight is the basis for a hypothesis that seems worth exploring: that John Dewey is able to speak eloquently to us today--as much as a century after he formulated his ideas--precisely because of his willingness to listen, to closely attend to those we might categorize as women and weirdoes. We use the provocative expression, "women and weirdoes," to acknowledge E&C/Education and Culture 23 (2) (2007): 27­62 27 28 Craig A. Cunningham et al. that John Dewey took seriously persons who often were not given credence in philosophical circles. During Dewey's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Culture Purdue University Press

A "Scientific Aesthetic Method": John Dewey, Albert Barnes and the Question of Aesthetic Formalism

Education and Culture, Volume 23 (2) – Sep 13, 2008

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Publisher
Purdue University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 John Dewey Society
ISSN
1559-1786
Publisher site
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Abstract

This symposium provides five case studies of the ways that John Dewey's philosophy and practice were influenced by women or "weirdoes" (our choices include F. M. Alexander, Albert Barnes, Helen Bradford Thompson, Elsie Ripley Clapp, and Jane Addams) and presents some conclusions about the value of dialoging across difference for philosophers and other scholars. Introduction In The Education of John Dewey, Jay Martin (2003) suggests, "It was and remained a characteristic of Dewey that he was always receptive to alternative ideas. With professional philosophers, he generally held to his own positions, but with intelligent women, non-philosophers, odd thinkers, and ordinary folk, he was a student again" (167). Martin's insight is the basis for a hypothesis that seems worth exploring: that John Dewey is able to speak eloquently to us today--as much as a century after he formulated his ideas--precisely because of his willingness to listen, to closely attend to those we might categorize as women and weirdoes. We use the provocative expression, "women and weirdoes," to acknowledge E&C/Education and Culture 23 (2) (2007): 27­62 27 28 Craig A. Cunningham et al. that John Dewey took seriously persons who often were not given credence in philosophical circles. During Dewey's

Journal

Education and CulturePurdue University Press

Published: Sep 13, 2008

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